Adjective "fife" definition and examples

(Fife may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/fʌɪf/

Definitions and examples

noun

A kind of small shrill flute used with the drum in military bands.
  1. 'Other musical instruments included stringed instruments such as fiddles and harps, and woodwind instruments such as flutes and fifes.'
  2. 'Amerindian men perform a dance in the local church to the accompaniment of fife and drums.'
  3. 'William Ferman complained that whenever he chose to stay out all night playing the fife in a saloon, his wife would harass him.'
  4. 'It consisted of thirty-two members, playing exclusively drums and fifes.'
  5. 'People were coming into the square from all sides, and down the street we heard the pipes and the fifes and the drums coming.'
  6. 'The Marine Band began as a fledgling band of fifes and drums through an act of Congress signed July 11, 1798 by President John Adams.'
  7. 'The priests trained in the bardic arts beat their drums, strummed on their lutes, and played on their fifes to a wild beat and a buoyant tune.'
  8. 'He played the fife and was a great lover of traditional music.'
  9. 'Little adornment was on her, except a single piercing at the top of her pointed ear, but what caught Kira's attention was the fife at her waist.'
  10. 'Increasing sophistication of construction allowed the development of complicated drum tunes, played in combination with tonal instruments such as fifes or bagpipes.'

verb

Play the fife.

    proper noun

    A council area and former county of east central Scotland; administrative centre, Glenrothes.

      More definitions

      1. a high-pitched transverse flute used commonly in military and marching musical groups. verb (used with or without object), fifed, fifing.

      2. to play on a fife.

      More examples(as adjective)

      "corpses can be fife."

      Origin

      Mid 16th century: from German Pfeife ‘pipe’, or from French fifre from Swiss German Pfifer ‘piper’.