Adjective "fiasco" definition and examples

(Fiasco may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/fɪˈaskəʊ/

Definitions and examples

noun

A complete failure, especially a ludicrous or humiliating one.
  1. 'Saturday's losing team, meanwhile, apologised for one of the biggest soccer fiascos Germany has ever suffered, expressing shame and remorse for only their second ever World Cup qualifying defeat.'
  2. 'If there are any baking fiascos this year with the bread I'm going to quit this tradition and just start making bunnies out of Rice Krispy treats.'
  3. 'Large events such as the Olympics and Commonwealth Games are often plagued by budget overruns, slack ticket sales and venue fiascos but bad publicity about Manchester has been notably absent.'
  4. 'By contrast, Churchill was keen to distance himself from various amphibious fiascos, especially the defeat at Dieppe in August 1942, which nobody can remember ordering.'
  5. 'If Namibia was a real constitutional democracy, President Nujoma should have been called to clear up scandals, fiascos and debacles that have characterized, mainly, the last five years of his rule.'
  6. 'Scotland Yard immediately launched an internal inquiry into the handling of the cases against both butlers which are estimated to have cost £2m and ended in one of the biggest legal fiascos in recent years.'
  7. 'Of course, there is also the parade of endless cartoons, strangely addictive infomercials, public access fiascos and creepy children's programming when the movie selection gets too boring.'
  8. 'Remembering the Government's record on previous computer purchase fiascos this is scheduled to be another expensive disaster.'
  9. 'The recent fiasco over parking charges has demonstrated their arrogance and incompetence.'
  10. 'When we see true ‘dictatorship,’ as opposed to yet another permutation of Parliamentary fiascos, we will see it in the eyes of the hysterical, not from their mouths.'

More definitions

1. a complete and ignominious failure.

2. a round-bottomed glass flask for wine, especially Chianti, fitted with a woven, protective raffia basket that also enables the bottle to stand upright.

More examples(as adjective)

"fuels can be fiasco."

"stands can be fiasco."

"days can be fiasco."

Origin

Mid 19th century: from Italian, literally ‘bottle, flask’, in the phrase far fiasco, literally ‘make a bottle’, figuratively ‘fail in a performance’: the reason for the figurative sense is unexplained.