Adjective "ferocious" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/fəˈrəʊʃəs/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Savagely fierce, cruel, or violent.
  1. 'a ferocious battle'
  2. 'The animal is a most ferocious and savage looking one.'
  3. 'The latter wild and ferocious creatures are so dangerous they have to be anaesthetised fully for Liam to work on them.'
  4. 'Those who oppose the government do so with some trepidation because it used ferocious violence in the past to silence any challenge.'
  5. 'Panicked images of starvation, destruction, and attacks by various ferocious wild animals clouded her vision.'
  6. 'She looked less ferocious and was actually smiling brightly at us.'
  7. 'They are ferocious beasts, killers, they devour anything in their path.'
  8. 'Those more ferocious animals were kept away while those less dangerous and more pleasing were allowed out.'
  9. 'Global warming has caused rising sea levels and more ferocious storms with bigger waves.'
  10. 'He also paid tribute to the work of London Fire Brigade in tackling the blaze and rescuing three of the children in extremely ferocious conditions.'
  11. 'Chaos descended across South Lakeland at the weekend as severe downpours and ferocious winds caused widespread flooding and damage to property.'
  12. 'He doesn't like troublemakers and has his own way of dishing out his own ferocious brand of punishment.'
  13. 'The ferocious weather inflicted severe damage to body panels and windscreens.'
  14. 'The tackling from both sides was ferocious and uncompromising.'

Definitions

1. savagely fierce, as a wild beast, person, action, or aspect; violently cruel: a ferocious beating.

2. extreme or intense: a ferocious thirst.

More examples(as adjective)

"competitions can be ferocious as spills."

"people can be ferocious in things."

"people can be ferocious in generosities."

"people can be ferocious in attacks."

"handsets can be ferocious as spills."

More examples++

Origin

Mid 17th century: from Latin ferox, feroc- ‘fierce’ + -ious.