Adjective "eschewing" definition and examples

(Eschewing may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ɛsˈtʃuː//ɪsˈtʃuː/

Definitions and examples

verb

Deliberately avoid using; abstain from.
  1. 'This is not a pacifist vision that eschews all uses of military force.'
  2. 'Fischer eschews the term gambling, preferring to call it ‘gaming’.'
  3. 'Asking that of her is far more intrusive than asking a person simply to eschew violence.'
  4. 'Writing that eschews cliché can be refined for eternity.'
  5. 'The best tribute to the Mahatma would be to eschew hatred and violence and to preach and practise brotherhood.'
  6. 'His call to reason and civil society and to eschewing irrationalities and violence is admirable.'
  7. 'Coleman deliberately eschews the emotional seduction natural to the film medium.'
  8. 'Avoiding the temptation to simply coast on her powerful voice, Case eschews the obvious and instead imbues her music with subtlety and atmosphere.'
  9. 'Despite such an awe-inspiring client list, Mankowitz eschews the notion of photographer-as-celebrity.'
  10. 'Davies avoids the trap by eschewing the conventions of drama altogether.'

More definitions

1. to abstain or keep away from; shun; avoid: to eschew evil.

More examples(as adjective)

"metaphorses can be eschewing."

Origin

(eschew)Late Middle English: from Old French eschiver, ultimately of Germanic origin and related to German scheuen ‘shun’, also to shy.