Adjective "erotic" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ɪˈrɒtɪk/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Relating to or tending to arouse sexual desire or excitement.
  1. 'Of course we have no way, not yet, of knowing the secrets of her erotic fantasies.'
  2. 'The thing is people who read this stuff probably think it is highly erotic, and they are just so naughty for reading it.'
  3. 'The power of many erotic fantasies relies more on concealment than full disclosure.'
  4. 'There are more magazines, more books written about horror than about erotic films.'
  5. 'But to see these images as either overtly sexual or even primarily erotic would be a big mistake.'
  6. 'To pluck food from a nude woman at a party is certainly sensual and quite likely erotic, but sexual?'
  7. 'She begins by attempting to distinguish between the erotic and the pornographic.'
  8. 'When I use him in my belly-dancing act, it works well, as it's an erotic, sensual dance.'
  9. 'They conceal erotic secrets and erotic treasures for which men have killed and been killed.'
  10. 'The piece is undoubtedly erotic, evoking the sexuality of both male and female bodies.'

Definitions

1. arousing or satisfying sexual desire: an erotic dance.

2. of, relating to, or treating of sexual love; amatory: an erotic novel.

3. subject to or marked by strong sexual desire. noun

4. an erotic poem.

5. an erotic person.

More examples(as adjective)

"scenes can be erotic."

"dreams can be erotic."

"fantasies can be erotic."

"dancings can be erotic."

"feelings can be erotic."

More examples++

Origin

Mid 17th century: from French érotique, from Greek erōtikos, from erōs, erōt- ‘sexual love’.