Adjective "equitable" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈɛkwɪtəb(ə)l/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Fair and impartial.
  1. 'We wanted to come up with a fair, equitable and easy way to reward bloggers for their writing.'
  2. 'The new programme will be based on clear rules and criteria, ensuring that access is fair and equitable.'
  3. 'There was still a long way to go towards, among other things, an equitable distribution of skills.'
  4. 'Emphasis on equitable distribution would truly alleviate the crime situation.'
  5. 'They are expected to protect all the athletes and to ensure fair and equitable competition.'
  6. 'Many now wished to return and it was fair and equitable that they should be assisted by the state.'
  7. 'I've always made the case that we should not get more than Irish, that would not be fair or equitable.'
  8. 'Churchill was right to say that a fair and equitable penal system lies at the heart of a healthy civilisation.'
  9. 'Do we feel our present taxation system is fair and equitable?'
  10. 'Economic growth was important, but so too was the equitable distribution of wealth.'
Valid in equity as distinct from law.
  1. 'the beneficiaries have an equitable interest in the property'
  2. 'Equitable mortgages can also arise from an agreement for value to give a legal mortgage and on the mortgage of an equitable interest.'
  3. 'So far, we have been considering what happens if the tenant under an equitable lease assigns his interest.'

Definitions

1. characterized by equity or fairness; just and right; fair; reasonable: equitable treatment of all citizens.

2. Law. pertaining to or valid in equity. pertaining to the system of equity, as distinguished from the common law.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be equitable for states."

"distributions can be equitable."

"interests can be equitable."

"corps can be equitable."

"corp.s can be equitable."

More examples++

Origin

Mid 16th century: from French équitable, from équité (see equity).