Adjective "epitaph" definition and examples

(Epitaph may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈɛpɪtaf//ˈɛpɪtɑːf/

Definitions and examples

noun

A phrase or form of words written in memory of a person who has died, especially as an inscription on a tombstone.
  1. 'I read what I had written about an epitaph that had struck me as particular and meaningful.'
  2. 'A single gravestone from this period may be inscribed with epitaphs that belong to as many as seven different individuals, though whether or not the grave contained seven bodies is unknown.'
  3. 'The epitaphs, written in many different languages, recorded an international community of the dead.'
  4. 'The recent inscription of his epitaph upon their large granite gravestone gave him a sense of contentment and presaged a new era for humankind.'
  5. 'How would you like to be remembered in your epitaph?'
  6. 'The wanderer realized this was not just a monument but also a grave, and the inscription was an epitaph.'
  7. 'This might be recorded on their tombstone as an epitaph or in an obituary, commemoration portrait, or in some cases a biography.'
  8. 'Surely knowing that he was writing his own epitaph, Frank, who lived in Piccadilly Village, last year published a candid autobiography, I Am What I Am.'
  9. 'I'm sure Barry meant well but I'd think twice before commissioning him to write your epitaph.'
  10. 'Naturally, the epitaph on his tombstone should read ‘Th-that-that's all folks!’'
  11. 'the story makes a sorry epitaph to a great career'

More definitions

1. a commemorative inscription on a tomb or mortuary monument about the person buried at that site.

2. a brief poem or other writing in praise of a deceased person. verb (used with object)

3. to commemorate in or with an epitaph.

More examples(as adjective)

"doubts can be epitaph."

Origin

Late Middle English: from Old French epitaphe, via Latin from Greek epitaphion ‘funeral oration’, neuter of ephitaphios ‘over or at a tomb’, from epi ‘upon’ + taphos ‘tomb’.