Adjective "embarrassing" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ɛmˈbarəsɪŋ//ɪmˈbarəsɪŋ/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Causing embarrassment.
  1. 'And discovery in the case could still prove very embarrassing for him, as well as hurtful to his wife and children.'
  2. 'It was becoming increasingly embarrassing for Cork at this stage and a total collapse was on the cards.'
  3. 'It would have been far too embarrassing for my father to allow the truth into the history.'
  4. 'It is also embarrassing for a team of our stature to go home without a victory.'
  5. 'I'm a young, shy, gay male with a very embarrassing problem.'
  6. 'It's always slightly embarrassing for anyone to talk about the meaning of life, especially if you're a philosopher.'
  7. 'And were they to say no, it could all prove very embarrassing for Tony.'
  8. 'Are cheap ‘value’ products packaged in order to make it embarrassing for people who aren't ‘wacky students’ to buy them?'
  9. 'I imagine it is very embarrassing for them to be found out for being so secretive.'
  10. 'Not only is this an embarrassing problem for you but it is also a potentially dangerous one.'

Definitions

1. to cause confusion and shame to; make uncomfortably self-conscious; disconcert; abash: His bad table manners embarrassed her.

2. to make difficult or intricate, as a question or problem; complicate.

3. to put obstacles or difficulties in the way of; impede: The motion was advanced in order to embarrass the progress of the bill.

4. to beset with financial difficulties; burden with debt: The decline in sales embarrassed the company. verb (used without object)

More examples(as adjective)

"ways can be embarrassing for regulators."

"speeches can be embarrassing in cities."

"scorelineses can be embarrassing at times."

"reports can be embarrassing to members."

"people can be embarrassing to writers."

More examples++

Origin

(embarrass)