Adjective "detect" definition and examples

(Detect may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/dɪˈtɛkt/

Definitions and examples

verb

Discover or identify the presence or existence of.
  1. 'The presence of nitrite is detected by a colour change to pink upon addition of specific reagents that can be seen visually.'
  2. 'In truth, she had thought that they would have detected each other's presence sooner.'
  3. 'Some of the increase can be traced to better ways of recognising cancer and detecting cancer in an early stage.'
  4. 'When his presence was detected the music paused and the gathering cheered his arrival.'
  5. 'As soon as the immune system detects the presence of a pathogen it mounts a response to kill it, which is highly successful in most cases in healthy people.'
  6. 'If a person under hypnosis is told that a glass of plain water is sweet, then he will really detect a sweet taste in the water.'
  7. 'As the produce of the land was the ultimate source of nearly all raw material and energy inputs, Landers detects a distinctive pattern in the organisation of production.'
  8. 'The men who manned the security machines did not notice Atta, or detect the knives that his team smuggled on to the plane.'
  9. 'Diagnostic kits for detecting hepatitis B alone are exempt from excise duty.'
  10. 'A pulse-Doppler radar operator detects an aircraft by noting a difference in the frequency of the transmitted and reflected energy.'
  11. 'Paul detected a faint note of weariness in his father's voice'
  12. 'I could barely detect the horseradish in the creamy bed of mashed potato, a more generous grating would have perked it up.'
  13. 'The male equine raised his head, his thin ears rotated slowly, detecting a faint sound.'
  14. 'He had just got done taking a shower but I could still detect the faint smell of bleach.'
  15. 'But the false note that can be detected in this episode has been sounding throughout the book, albeit more quietly.'
  16. 'For all the laughs their comedies still elicit, you can't help but detect a note of regret in their remarks.'
  17. 'Bhogji village in Osmanabad district could be detected by the smells that emanated from it.'
  18. 'And, at the very end I swear I could detect the faint beginnings of a smile in his voice.'
  19. 'You can almost hear the organ playing devotional music in the background, and detect the faintest whiff of incense on the breeze.'
  20. 'Mr Hutchence says staff first detected a faint smell the day before - but on Wednesday it was much stronger.'
  21. 'the public can help the police to detect crime'
  22. 'Online insurer Esure is to use technology that recognises when a speaker is under stress in a bid to detect fraud.'
  23. 'The scam was detected when a ChoicePoint employee noticed a suspicious application to open a customer account.'
  24. 'To detect the fraud however one must study the picture more closely.'
  25. 'He had great praise for Portlaoise Business Watch and said the group had a strong record in detecting and preventing crime in local shops.'
  26. 'The figures reveal Malmesbury police have succeeded in their crack-down on crime by detecting more offences than any other police area in Wiltshire.'
  27. 'High Street betting shops do not identify gamblers which can make detecting fraud, and prosecuting fraudsters, more difficult.'
  28. 'His misconduct was detected because access to those sites was blocked.'
  29. 'Keys allow for ongoing access and the ability to return files, so it's hard to detect theft.'
  30. 'As a commercial credit auditor, her job was to detect fraud in receivables accounting.'
  31. 'Even the fact that there is the ability to detect murder before it is committed is a complex issue.'

More definitions

1. to discover or catch (a person) in the performance of some act: to detect someone cheating.

2. to discover the existence of: to detect the odor of gas.

3. to find out the true character or activity of: to detect a spy.

4. Telecommunications. to rectify alternating signal currents in a radio receiver. to demodulate.

More examples(as adjective)

"components can be detect with carbonates."

"components can be detect in solutions."

"components can be detect in calcites."

"people can be detect."

"doctors can be detect."

More examples++

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin detect- ‘uncovered’, from the verb detegere, from de- (expressing reversal) + tegere ‘to cover’. The original senses were ‘uncover, expose’ and ‘give someone away’, later ‘expose the real or hidden nature of’; hence the current (partly influenced by detective).