Adjective "denominations" definition and examples

(Denominations may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/dɪˌnɒmɪˈneɪʃ(ə)n/

Definitions and examples

noun

A recognized autonomous branch of the Christian Church.
  1. 'The Roman Catholic Church and the Free Methodist Church and other denominations have their own rules for what constitutes a marriage in their eyes.'
  2. 'As this incident suggests, the move to the mainstream had significant ramifications for relationships with other denominations.'
  3. 'Hundreds of churches of various denominations across the country are using it as a resource to start these important conversations.'
  4. 'The Protestant and Roman Catholic churches are the main Christian denominations.'
  5. 'Far more often than they named any service the denomination provides to them, they talked about how their denominational mission and relief agencies do good work that they want to support.'
  6. 'Mr Cobell is sure only a minority attend services but many people from all denominations attend services.'
  7. 'The main Christian denominations have established fine churches in the town and congregations not only hold services but are involved in community care.'
  8. 'With denominationalism on the rise, the Presbyterians established their own Board of Foreign Missions in 1837, and many other denominations followed suit.'
  9. 'Once a rallying cry of mainline churches in the 1960s, racially integrated churches number only 2 to 3 percent within mainline denominations today.'
  10. 'Pretty much all Christian denominations and traditions celebrate Christmas and so it's a good reminder of our common roots and ancestry.'
  11. 'Orthodox Jewish denominations'
  12. 'Think of the many denominations, sects or cults in America which function primarily as religions of individual salvation.'
  13. 'Though many denominations and religious organizations have their own traditions and practices, I'll focus here on the mainline and evangelical versions of healing services.'
  14. 'Until recently, social mobility of members of the various religious denominations has hardly received any attention.'
  15. 'A religious group includes denomination or mode of worship or a group sharing common beliefs.'
  16. 'I argue that, in addition to organizational dynamics, the analogy of family relationships may also be fruitful for understanding gender in modern religious denominations.'
  17. 'Under the Constitution, as interpreted by the courts, not only religions but also religious denominations are protected - for good reason.'
  18. 'Our concern in this article is not to comment on the importance of denominations but to examine denominational loyalty over time in a cross-denominational sample.'
  19. 'Even within denominations, there are different interpretations.'
  20. 'There are over 100 denominations and religious sects in Barbados.'
  21. 'Sectarianism is about religious denominations.'
The face value of a banknote, coin, or postage stamp.
  1. 'When the Euro was introduced, the denominations of the coins and the banknotes had to create some sort of compromise between the monetary habits of the various European countries.'
  2. 'A euro consists of 100 cents and cents coins will be in denominations of one, two, five, ten, 20 and 50.'
  3. 'These coins were of various denominations and belong to different ages.'
  4. 'There's hardly a week passes that the school doesn't ask for money of some denomination, so why they don't help with the parking situation is a joke.'
  5. 'The problem is that the government refuses to acknowledge that a problem exists and simply prints banknotes with larger denominations.'
  6. 'By law, currency issued by the government, in any form and denomination is the acceptable medium for commercial transaction unless otherwise stated.'
  7. 'They received payment in the form of both paper currency and coins of various denominations.'
  8. 'British currency had been de facto gold through much of the 1700s and until 1800 lacked small denomination coins.'
  9. 'The drugs trade, for example, tends to make its illicit gains in the form of small denomination bank notes.'
  10. 'The larger denomination coins and the notes are being spent but the vast majority of opinion regards them as having little spending power.'
  11. 'two cards of the same denomination'
  12. 'As different coloured cards have different powers, Barry and Vice Barry can choose which colour they receive from Les and Vice Les, but only if the Les's have multiple cards of the same denomination.'
  13. 'Within each denomination the cards rank Club, Spade, Heart, Diamond (low).'
  14. 'If 2 or more players play discards to a trick that are the same denomination, suits come into play.'
A name or designation.
  1. 'Although at first the area received other denominations, this geographical characteristic finally inspired the actual name.'
  2. 'I've found myself categorized into a box when I mention denomination - either what I grew up with or where I currently serve.'
  3. 'the denomination of a consideration as relevant or irrelevant'
  4. 'The Pixies' originals are masterpieces, but the second disc seems to indicate that they are fragile in that denomination.'

More definitions

1. a religious group, usually including many local churches, often larger than a sect: the Lutheran denomination.

2. one of the grades or degrees in a series of designations of quantity, value, measure, weight, etc.: He paid $500 in bills of small denomination.

3. a name or designation, especially one for a class of things.

4. a class or kind of persons or things distinguished by a specific name.

5. the act of naming or designating a person or thing.

More examples(as adjective)

"worths can be denominations."

"interests can be denominations."

"rangings can be denominations."

"churches can be denominations."

"lists can be denominations."

More examples++

Origin

(denomination)Late Middle English (in denomination (sense 3)): from Latin denominatio(n-), from the verb denominare (see denominate). denomination (sense 1) dates from the mid 17th century.