Adjective "dengue" definition and examples

(Dengue may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈdɛŋɡi/

Definitions and examples

noun

A debilitating viral disease of the tropics, transmitted by mosquitoes, and causing sudden fever and acute pains in the joints.
  1. 'Dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever is a viral disease carried by mosquitoes.'
  2. 'Also, you have to look into diseases like malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, and typhoid.'
  3. 'Common scourges found in the desert include plague, typhus, malaria, dengue fever, dysentery, cholera, and typhoid.'
  4. 'Dengue fever can cause encephalitis as well, but the more serious illness is dengue haemorrhagic fever, " Tsang said.'
  5. 'Mosquito borne diseases, such as dengue fever and encephalitis, are generally more influenced by ambient conditions than diseases passed directly from human to human.'
  6. 'The role of global environmental change on diseases such as malaria, dengue fever, and cholera has been well documented.'
  7. 'Combined with a shortage of food and medicine these conditions create the potential for epidemics of cholera, malaria, dengue fever and diarrhoea.'
  8. 'Health and education facilities are minimal and diseases such as malaria, dengue fever and tuberculosis are common.'
  9. 'Across the island, public hospitals are overcrowded with patients suffering from dengue and other viral fevers.'
  10. 'Diseases like malaria, dengue fever and cholera can spread quickly especially in temperatures over 30 degrees.'

More definitions

1. an infectious, eruptive fever of warm climates, usually epidemic, characterized especially by severe pains in the joints and muscles.

More examples(as adjective)

"fevers can be dengue."

"cases can be dengue."

"outbreaks can be dengue."

"epidemics can be dengue."

"branches can be dengue."

More examples++

Origin

Early 19th century: from West Indian Spanish, from Kiswahili dinga (in full kidingapopo), influenced by Spanish dengue ‘fastidiousness’ (with reference to the dislike of movement by affected patients).