Adjective "demoralized" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/dɪˈmɒrəlʌɪzd/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Having lost confidence or hope; disheartened.
  1. 'If we cannot appreciate our achievements we will become demoralised and unhappy.'
  2. 'Sadly, they have been demoralised by an unsupportive management.'
  3. 'Many were killed quickly and the survivors so demoralized that 145 surrendered and were captured.'
  4. 'Our enemy is emboldened and our own people demoralised.'
  5. 'Overconfidence in their chances of taking the demoralised Army side proved to be the downfall of the Navy men.'
  6. 'In the beginning, I was in tears after every lesson and felt demoralised.'
  7. 'Instead of getting on with something useful, managers will be delayed and demoralised by a blizzard of forms to fill in.'
  8. 'The party must re-group and must galvanise its demoralised membership.'
  9. 'Without our most important member, the group had been demoralized.'
  10. 'Dean is authentically awkward, authentically demoralized.'

Definitions

1. to deprive (a person or persons) of spirit, courage, discipline, etc.; destroy the morale of: The continuous barrage demoralized the infantry.

2. to throw (a person) into disorder or confusion; bewilder: We were so demoralized by that one wrong turn that we were lost for hours.

3. to corrupt or undermine the morals of.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be demoralized by practices."

"people can be demoralized."

"polices can be demoralized."

"armies can be demoralized."

"whiles can be demoralized."

More examples++

Origin

(demoralize)