Adjective "demonstrable" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/dɪˈmɒnstrəb(ə)l/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Clearly apparent or capable of being logically proved.
  1. 'The supermarket chain argues that the extension plans will enhance the vitality and viability of the town centre without causing demonstrable harm.'
  2. 'As far as we know none of them succeeded in any demonstrable way.'
  3. 'Unless there is demonstrable chance of harm to the child, grandparents should be able to visit their grandchildren.'
  4. 'They need to make sure that cameras are at sites where their need is demonstrable.'
  5. 'You need superior technology, but you also need a demonstrable advantage over any competing method of doing business.'
  6. 'I think it's something that could be resented by students and parents alike, particularly if they didn't believe there was a demonstrable need for it.'
  7. 'Group influences on the individual are marked, easily demonstrable and pervasive.'
  8. 'But there is no demonstrable shortage of low skilled workers in the United States today.'
  9. 'The limitations of such a view of ‘instinct’ are clearly demonstrable in Freud's writings on art and artists.'
  10. 'It is demonstrable, for that matter, that poverty and poor health go together.'

Definitions

1. capable of being demonstrated or proved.

2. clearly evident; obvious: a demonstrable lack of concern for the general welfare.

More examples(as adjective)

"losses can be demonstrable with insulins."

"harms can be demonstrable."

"benefits can be demonstrable."

"progresses can be demonstrable."

"lacks can be demonstrable."

More examples++

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin demonstrabilis, from demonstrare ‘point out’.