Adjective "demeaned" definition and examples

(Demeaned may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/dɪˈmiːn/

Definitions and examples

verb

Cause a severe loss in the dignity of and respect for (someone or something)
  1. 'When children are demeaned and injured rather than respected and nurtured, they do not develop a sense of their own power and an ability to maintain their own boundaries.'
  2. 'But you abused, debased and threatened that woman, threatening her and demeaning her.'
  3. 'Don't think I am demeaning his achievement by saying it comes from not getting bored.'
  4. 'There are ways and means of showing respect without such references, which only demean the person who makes use of the term.'
  5. 'To think of students as customers cheapens and demeans post-secondary education.'
  6. 'But when they demean a work of beauty and dignity that has shaped English history and literature as no other book, they invite retribution.'
  7. 'I am not in any way demeaning our brave men folk but they do generally get more coverage than us ladies.'
  8. 'It demeans the people who do this work by telling them that their work is not important - that it is low-grade and demeaning.'
  9. 'The editor rejects as ‘drivel’ any suggestion that his paper may be demeaning women.'
  10. 'While comparing products, they were not allowed to degrade or demean the merchandise offered by competitors.'
  11. 'Neither demeaning themselves to meet low tastes, nor overbearing in their presentation, they fit in perfectly with their requirement as a typical TV presenter.'
  12. 'But there are things that it's been criticised for unfairly, and worse - reactions from audiences and critics that demean themselves and our culture.'
  13. 'Too many people, though - many of them female - still seem to think that a woman demeans herself when she wears a revealing dress.'
  14. 'I would rather die than demean myself by serving customers.'
  15. 'And no caveats either - don't patronise me or demean yourself by trying to justify anything.'
  16. 'Perhaps, no human being would want to demean himself by seeking succour along the streets and from strangers.'
  17. 'I would not mind if they only demeaned themselves.'
  18. 'I wouldn't demean myself by running a mile, unless I was immediately going to follow it by running another twelve miles at least.'
  19. 'She says ambitious celebrities who appear topless or in bikinis in steamy photo shoots are ‘disgusting’ and are demeaning themselves.'
  20. 'They are demeaning themselves and making themselves unsuccessful.'

verb

Conduct oneself in a particular way.

    More definitions

    1. to lower in dignity, honor, or standing; debase: He demeaned himself by accepting the bribe.

    More examples(as adjective)

    "lives can be demeaned."

    "judges can be demeaned."

    Origin

    (demean)Middle English (also in the sense ‘manage, control’): from Old French demener ‘to lead’, based on Latin de- ‘away’ + minare ‘drive (animals), drive on with threats’ (from minari ‘threaten’).