Adjective "decompression" definition and examples

(Decompression may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/diːkəmˈprɛʃ(ə)n/

Definitions and examples

noun

Reduction in air pressure.
  1. 'This seems like the suggestion of a second-rate Hollywood director, for the single reason that you cannot discharge a firearm in a pressurised environment, because there would be catastrophic decompression.'
  2. 'As part of the unique package, he would receive training in freefall parachuting, high-altitude decompression, basic radio procedures and reusable launch vehicle systems operation.'
  3. 'Three factors affect the rate of decompression: The volume of the cabin, the size of the opening, and the difference in pressure between the inside and outside of the plane.'
  4. 'Liz Verdier, a spokesperson for Boeing, said the 737s, like all Boeing planes, were equipped with warning systems that alerted pilots when decompression was occurring.'
  5. 'Investigators are testing whether some other substance may have knocked out the crew and the passengers of the jet and are still examining whether cabin decompression was the fatal catalyst.'
  6. 'An aviation expert added that even a small explosion on board could have been enough to cause decompression and suck people out of the aircraft.'
  7. 'During the second week of their holiday a Helios plane, flying out of Cyprus, crashed due to what was reported to be because of a lack of oxygen in the cabin due to decompression.'
  8. 'The risk, of course, is that a bullet could pierce the shell of an airplane and decompression could happen.'
  9. as modifier 'the swim took some two hours, including a one hour decompression stop'
  10. 'This reef gets shallower all the time, so we were able to enjoy around 30 minutes on it before decompression became an issue.'
  11. 'Before they return to the surface they will need to undergo a 17-hour decompression in the Aquarius, with atmospheric pressure gradually reduced to that on the surface.'
The process of expanding computer data to its normal size so that it can be read by a computer.
  1. 'I projected how long compression and decompression should take on computers of various speeds by simply scaling actual test results from my 1.7GHz CPU.'
  2. 'The inverse process - decompression - doesn't put any serious load on the memory subsystem.'
  3. 'As well as the Windows help bug ‘fix’, there's also a patch for flaws in handling file decompression.'

More definitions

1. the gradual reduction in atmospheric pressure experienced by divers, construction workers, etc., after working in deep water or breathing compressed air.

2. the act or process of releasing from pressure.

3. Surgery. the procedure of relieving increased cranial, cardiac, or orbital pressure.

4. a state of relief from pressure; a return to normalcy after a stressful period or situation.

5. Computers. the restoration of data that has undergone compression to its original state.|-

More examples(as adjective)

"dives can be decompression."