Adjective "daunted" definition and examples

(Daunted may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/dɔːnt/

Definitions and examples

verb

Make (someone) feel intimidated or apprehensive.
  1. 'Denise isn't daunted about hosting her own show, and doesn't worry about what the press say.'
  2. 'The prospect of transplant surgery does not daunt her.'
  3. 'Now, here we were as pensioners, setting out on an expedition that might have daunted us when we were teenagers.'
  4. 'Most of my travels having been to hot places, I was daunted at the prospect of such cold - but the invitation was irresistible.'
  5. 'He isn't daunted by the attention the tattoo will attract.'
  6. 'Iruwan admits that he is slightly daunted by the prospect of racing in front of his home crowd.'
  7. 'No situation now daunts him, nor does any opponent.'
  8. 'Even the prospect of getting down to taxing schoolwork did not daunt Amy.'
  9. 'Hard work never daunted him and when his wife Nora died 32 years ago, he raised his family of nine.'
  10. 'True, the country's problems would daunt any leader, but he has not addressed any of them effectively after a year in office.'

More definitions

1. to overcome with fear; intimidate: to daunt one's adversaries.

2. to lessen the courage of; dishearten: Don't be daunted by the amount of work still to be done.

More examples(as adjective)

"teachers can be daunted at prospects."

"teachers can be daunted at copings."

"people can be daunted by prices."

"people can be daunted by complexities."

"people can be daunted."

More examples++

Origin

(daunt)Middle English: from Old French danter, from Latin domitare, frequentative of domare ‘to tame’.

Phrase

nothing daunted