Adjective "datelined" definition and examples

(Datelined may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈdeɪtlʌɪn/

Definitions and examples

noun

A line at the head of a dispatch or newspaper article showing the date and place of writing.
  1. 'Some journalists will put a dateline on a story even if the reporter never left the office.'
  2. 'Is it OK to use a dateline if the reporter did an interview in that town, even if it wasn't the most important interview of the story?'
  3. 'At least on stories beyond a newspaper's immediate coverage area, a dateline, in combination with a byline, means that the reporter gathered most of the information on the location.'
  4. 'A dateline is dishonest if the reporter is sitting at home, using the telephone or email to close the distance with the source.'
  5. 'Thus each of my 17 chapters begins with a dateline, as if it were a journalistic dispatch.'
  6. 'The byline is Bumiller's and the dateline is Clive, IA, which means she was physically in Clive at some point, but you'd never know it.'
  7. 'We decided to use datelines on staff-bylined stories only when the reporter has reported, in person, from that city or town.'
  8. 'Among the items that had become opaque were datelines and bylines, which were sometimes close to a lie.'
  9. 'Make sure to include a name, news organization, and military unit or, if you're pointing us to an independent reporter, a recent dateline.'
  10. 'His journalistic coups and exotic datelines made his old colleagues proud.'

verb

Mark (a dispatch or article) with a dateline.
  1. 'There's a piece up on the New York Times website, datelined tomorrow, which discusses this story.'
  2. 'The invitation from Kim was sent to the Kremlin early this month, Itar-Tass news agency said Wednesday in a report datelined Pyongyang.'
  3. 'There is an entry for each of 200 days of campaigning, usually several, datelined by town.'
  4. 'On February 28, 1998, an unsigned article, datelined Tallinn, appeared in The Economist.'
  5. 'This brings us nicely to the final part of this saga, but before we move on, one more thing: both stories were datelined San Francisco.'
  6. 'The first, datelined Charleston, reports on the proliferation of pork barrel federal projects named for Democratic Sen.'
  7. 'Powers writes that a week later the teller read an Associated Press story datelined Havana in which Fidel Castro damned the CIA for its plots against Cuba and specifically mentioned funds that had come from Arthur Avignon.'
  8. 'On April 13, 1975, a Schanberg story datelined from Phnom Penh was headlined: ‘Indochina without Americans: For Most, a Better Life.’'
  9. 'One typical press account of the events, datelined Cape Canaveral, stated that ‘the project advanced space exploration and improved Cold War relations between the two countries.’'
  10. 'The first article to appear, datelined July 22, was by Dusan Stojanovic of the Associated Press, filed from Kabul.'

More definitions

1. a line of text giving the place of origin and usually the date of a news dispatch or the like. verb (used with object), datelined, datelining.

2. to furnish (a news story) with a dateline: He datelines his reports Damascus.

More examples(as adjective)

"republics can be datelined."

Origin

(dateline)