Adjective "covetous" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈkʌvɪtəs/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Having or showing a great desire to possess something belonging to someone else.
  1. 'It was the latter's reputation of which Silvers was bound to be especially covetous.'
  2. 'A few of the other deadly sins arise from covetous vision.'
  3. 'By capturing them on canvas he forever locates them, with covetous jealousy, within his private, contained artistic universe.'
  4. 'He was rash, arrogant and obstinate, contentious, envious and malicious, covetous and corrupt.'
  5. 'For now, though, buyers are still a bit covetous with the green stuff.'
  6. 'Christensen thinks that this new approach to power won't go out of style, that the negative always breeds covetous attention.'
  7. 'An enterprising news director covetous of higher ratings might well think about slanting his news to the right.'
  8. 'Islanders do not openly admire the possessions of others because it suggests that one is envious and covetous.'
  9. 'The truth is that because of the unbiased media today, these covetous politicians have been exposed.'
  10. 'Real Madrid have been making covetous eyes at the free-scoring Dutchman.'

Definitions

1. inordinately or wrongly desirous of wealth or possessions; greedy.

2. eagerly desirous.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be covetous in/at/on ways."

"eyes can be covetous."

"murderers can be covetous."

"rules can be covetous."

"rivals can be covetous."

More examples++

Origin

Middle English: from Old French coveitous, based on Latin cupiditas (see cupidity).