Adjective "cost" definition and examples

(Cost may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/kɒst/

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Definitions and examples

verb

(of an object or action) require the payment of (a specified sum of money) before it can be acquired or done.
  1. with two objects 'the journey will cost her £25'
  2. 'His last jaunt to Bermuda cost the princely sum of 27.50 a night.'
  3. 'The four-year Olympic cycle for preparation of Bulgaria cost the humble sum of seven million leva.'
  4. 'She must dial a long distance number, which can cost great sums of money for extended Internet use.'
  5. 'With delays and changes to software requirements costing extra money, there is always the danger that projects could spin out of control, ultimately delaying services and profits.'
  6. 'The empire cost a vast sum of money to run and trade brought in much of that money.'
  7. 'Some of these benefits cost significant sums of money to provide.'
  8. 'It costs a reasonable sum of money to get in, and it never struck me as being worthwhile to pay it for a quick lunchtime scan.'
  9. 'Answering such questions would require collecting better evidence, which costs real money.'
  10. 'Expansion costs money, but revenue has never been a problem for this entrepreneur.'
  11. 'On the flip side of the coin they cost the British tax payer millions every year, and have become out of touch with the public.'
  12. 'It was a lack of putting touch that cost him the chance of achieving his long-held dream of playing in The Open.'
  13. 'It was a huge risk that could have cost him his job.'
  14. 'The two drivers were involved in a mishap on the track that cost him the lead and put him out of the race.'
  15. 'That loss a couple of weeks ago probably cost the Dubliners their league chances but this game is not about revenge.'
  16. 'Again the ineffectiveness of him cost the attack much of its ability to maintain serious pressure.'
  17. 'To me, this effort is costing him power and accuracy.'
  18. 'Two of the women suing told yesterday how the side effects almost cost them their lives.'
  19. 'It's the same arrogance that cost them the General Election.'
  20. 'In both away matches this season, Livi have sat in and invited attack, which duly cost them goals.'
  21. 'He had a fly ball sail over his head for a double, and it cost the team three runs.'
  22. 'if you want to own an island, it'll cost you'
  23. 'He did not want to consider the public tendencies then and he did the same thing now, two years afterwards, which cost him.'
  24. 'There are too many things that cost and not enough stuff that doesn't cost you.'
Estimate the price of.
  1. 'He said the plans would be carefully costed and clear for all to see.'
  2. 'It's not costed into the price of our t-shirts.'
  3. 'They have always had costed plans to make sure pensions are funded generously.'
  4. 'It has to be confiscation, not purchase, as the ‘retrieval’ was not costed, or any price quoted.'
  5. 'Two public meetings will be held to discuss the plans, which will then be modified and a fully costed business plan will be drawn up to gain funding.'
  6. 'He did criticise them for failing to cost their plans properly.'
  7. 'No, New Labour refuted the advert because they say the plans aren't costed properly.'
  8. 'This would form the basis for plans which can be costed and a suitable site found.'

noun

An amount that has to be paid or spent to buy or obtain something.
  1. 'health-care costs'
  2. 'They've had to work 10 % harder to raise funds to cover increased running costs.'
  3. 'The fee per session is 5 euro to cover the cost of coaching and insurance.'
  4. 'The amount is only enough to cover the cost of transportation and food.'
  5. 'The result is a significantly reduced total cost of ownership for the storage infrastructure.'
  6. 'To support the show and to help cover the cost of prize money, we are selling advertising for the night.'
  7. 'Another factor to consider is the high costs associated with repairing major appliances.'
  8. 'Did the fuel tanker rebuild facility request a higher average cost per unit?'
  9. 'Also, what you save on plane tickets alone might cover the cost of one cruise.'
  10. 'If this amount cannot cover the cost of the claim, then the balance is met out of the public purse.'
  11. 'Now that the industry is approaching its mature phase, prices can afford to rise to cover average total cost.'
  12. 'the government succeeded in diverting resources away from consumption at considerable cost to its political popularity'
  13. 'Yet visual primacy is often at the cost of more effective aural forms of communication.'
  14. 'Such a channel bonanza, however, may come at the cost of sacrificing channel capacity.'
  15. 'Higher real wages were therefore achieved at the cost of tighter work discipline and an increase in the workload.'
  16. 'In addition, while conservative, this assumption is made at the cost of a great loss in power.'
  17. 'To wait until such a time as when you have complete understanding, at the cost of so many lives, is the failure of leadership.'
  18. 'She did it twice and repaired the rigging, but at the cost of damage to herself.'
  19. 'The worst off aren't helped if equality is achieved at the cost of them getting poorer.'
  20. 'I only hope that my newly achieved rights and freedoms will not be at the cost of someone else's.'
  21. 'These give excellent levels of grip on tarmac and in mud, but this is at the cost of some tyre rumble and a slight loss of precision.'
  22. 'The use of quality criteria makes comparison of trials easier to understand, but at the cost of inevitable loss of accuracy.'
  23. 'The adjudication clause permits the Adjudicator to award costs to the winning party.'
  24. 'It is thought that the costs and legal fees cost him most of his career earnings.'
  25. 'Number One is the represented litigant who is compensated for both costs and counsel fees.'
  26. 'The claim is dismissed and the order makes provision for the legal aid assessment of costs.'
  27. 'The applicant is to pay the costs of the respondent of the summons on an indemnity basis.'
  28. 'The bill allows the employee to seek penalties, interest, costs of the suit, and attorney fees.'
  29. 'These can include requirements such as security for costs from foreign plaintiffs, or the denial of legal aid.'
  30. 'Holding MPC liable for the defendants' costs would discourage the funding of litigation.'
  31. 'The son was convicted but the defendant was acquitted and awarded his costs out of central funds.'
  32. 'There will also be detailed assessment of the claimant's costs for public funding purposes.'

More definitions

1. the price paid to acquire, produce, accomplish, or maintain anything: the high cost of a good meal.

2. an outlay or expenditure of money, time, labor, trouble, etc.: What will the cost be to me?

3. a sacrifice, loss, or penalty: to work at the cost of one's health.

4. costs, Law. money allowed to a successful party in a lawsuit in compensation for legal expenses incurred, chargeable to the unsuccessful party. money due to a court or one of its officers for services in a caus

More examples(as adjective)

"cherries can be cost in states."

"vessels can be cost in/at/on pounds."

"vandalisms can be cost in repairs."

"sites can be cost in/at/on months."

"sites can be cost at ends."

More examples++

Origin

Middle English: from Old French coust (noun), couster (verb), based on Latin constare ‘stand firm, stand at a price’.

Phrase

at all costs (or at any cost)
at cost
cost someone dear (or dearly)
to someone's cost