Adjective "compassionate" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/kəmˈpaʃ(ə)nət/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Feeling or showing sympathy and concern for others.
  1. 'she tried to sound compassionate'
  2. 'You were a very caring and compassionate man, who was always there to lend a helping hand.'
  3. 'He is very caring and compassionate, and is very protective towards his mother and sister.'
  4. 'The Council will at all times act in a humane and compassionate fashion.'
  5. 'I still have trouble understanding how you can be too tolerant or too compassionate.'
  6. 'If we cannot be compassionate to animals, heaven help the human race.'
  7. 'The groom was a caring and compassionate young man who wanted to be her husband, more than anything.'
  8. 'A compassionate and civilised society must find a way to understand and accommodate refugees.'
  9. 'He was blessed with a caring and compassionate nature which was ever to the fore.'
  10. 'Doreen was renowned for her caring and compassionate nature and her kindness to so many people.'
  11. 'Kitty was full of good nature and her kind and compassionate ways endeared her to one and all.'

Definitions

1. having or showing compassion: a compassionate person; a compassionate letter.

2. granted in an emergency: compassionate military leave granted to attend a funeral.

3. Obsolete. pitiable. verb (used with object), compassionated, compassionating.

4. Archaic. to pity or have compassion for.

More examples(as adjective)

"wests can be compassionate by things."

"policemen can be compassionate to somes."

"people can be compassionate."

"leaves can be compassionate."

"grounds can be compassionate."

More examples++

Origin

Late 16th century: from compassion + -ate, influenced by archaic French compassioné ‘feeling pity’.