Adjective "colossal" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/kəˈlɒs(ə)l/

Advertisement

Definitions and examples

adjective

Extremely large or great.
  1. 'a colossal mistake'
  2. 'Now we're paying a huge price for their colossal mistake.'
  3. 'On the surface, it would appear to be a colossal waste of money.'
  4. 'Yet it is a colossal mistake to concentrate on the negative aspects of our society and to be blind to so much of value.'
  5. 'For any of them to become a reality would require a massive amount of consultation, colossal investment and a great deal of faith.'
  6. 'Every one knows of the huge waiting lists of the NHS; just think what a difference the colossal amounts of money paid out in compensation would make to these!'
  7. 'They spend colossal amounts of money on their dogs over there.'
  8. 'The amount of money generated for the local economy in salaries alone is colossal.'
  9. 'I thought it was a mistake of colossal magnitude and I still do.'
  10. 'She has put on a colossal amount of weight though, so I hope she's doing ok and it's not a bad sign.'
  11. '£35,000 is a colossal amount of debt to start your working life with.'
  12. 'Today, the colossal bronze statue of Atlas stands on the site of the Mills house.'
  13. 'Stepping off the airplane and into the Houston humidity, the first sight I spotted was not my homesick sister Laura, but a colossal bronze statue of George H.W. Bush.'
(of an order) having more than one storey of columns.
  1. 'It is also the only building in the parish with colossal order columns.'

Definitions

1. extraordinarily great in size, extent, or degree; gigantic; huge.

2. of or resembling a colossus.

3. (initial capital letter) Architecture. noting or pertaining to a classical order whose columns or pilasters span two or more stories of a building.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be colossal in/at/on inches."

"numbers can be colossal in estimates."

"amounts can be colossal."

"statues can be colossal."

"wearinesses can be colossal."

More examples++

Origin

Early 18th century: from French, from colosse, from Latin colossus (see colossus).