Adjective "clot" definition and examples

(Clot may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/klɒt/

Definitions and examples

noun

A thick mass of coagulated liquid, especially blood, or of material stuck together.
  1. 'a clot of dead leaves'
  2. 'In a healthy person, the body is able to protect itself from excessive bleeding, by allowing a part of the blood called plasma to stick together and form clots.'
  3. 'She wiped away the little clot of blood on his right ear and kissed it.'
  4. 'Aspirin has been used to treat heart disease because it thins blood and prevents clots.'
  5. 'My wife rushed me to the local emergency room where they gave me an EKG and administered blood thinners to break up the clot that was obstructing blood flow to my heart.'
  6. 'Stroke is caused by a clot which prevents blood from reaching the brain and is one of the single biggest killers behind cancer and heart disease.'
  7. 'Depression alters the propensity of the blood to form clots.'
  8. 'Blood clots can be deadly, leading to strokes, for example, or blocking the lungs' supply of blood from the heart.'
A foolish or clumsy person.
  1. 'Maybe somewhere my friend was being similarly greeted and on the cusp of turning from a loveable clot into a threatening idiot.'

verb

Form or cause to form clots.
  1. with object 'a blood protein known as factor VIII clots blood'
  2. 'Platelets are blood components that aid clotting.'
  3. 'A blood sample may be taken to check for anaemia or abnormalities in the way blood is clotting.'
  4. 'It can be caused by congenital defects or problems with the blood clotting.'
  5. '‘It reduces the stickiness of platelets and makes the blood less able to clot, which is the cause of strokes,’ she said.'
  6. 'They are looking at why some people have blood platelets which clot inside the vessels, causing blockages, starving the heart of oxygen, leading to a heart attack.'
  7. 'The blade came out easily, but it remained covered in thick, rancid-looking, clotted blood.'
  8. 'The snow had melted, showing sodden branches and clotted lumps of brown leaves through the woods.'
  9. 'Samples were immediately removed from direct light and allowed to clot prior to chilling on ice.'
  10. 'Excessive amounts of these hormones cause a dangerous increase in blood pressure, blood clotting, and blood sugar.'
  11. 'Too much vitamin E can cause internal bleeding and can hinder blood clotting, at least in animals.'
  12. 'its nostrils were clotted with blood'
  13. 'This prints with a dense black, slightly clotted effect, known as burr.'
  14. 'Your faces are clotted with pimples, and your hair is oily.'

More definitions

1. a mass or lump.

2. a semisolid mass, as of coagulated blood.

3. a small compact group of individuals: a clot of sightseers massed at the entrance.

4. British Informal. blockhead, dolt, clod. verb (used without object), clotted, clotting.

5. to form into clots; coagulate. verb (used with object), clotted, clotting.

6. to cause to clot.

7. to cover with clots: Carefully aimed snowballs clotted the house.

8. to cause to become blocked or obscured: to clot the book's na

More examples(as adjective)

"protrudings can be clot."

Origin

Old English clott, clot, of Germanic origin; related to German Klotz.