Adjective "citric" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈsɪtrɪk/

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Definitions and examples

adjective

Derived from or related to citrus fruit.
  1. 'Other options include quesadillas, fajitas, wraps and several meal-size salads with a refreshing and slightly citric cumin dressing served on fresh nacho chips.'
  2. 'The chef uses crumbled bacon and a hit of citric kalamansi juice and sake to season sweet and creamy scallops, and a small, perfectly rare tuna steak needs nothing more than a touch of ginger-soy.'
  3. 'Although it is dry, clean and relatively flavourless (it is brewed in part with sucrose, which ferments almost perfectly), it has a nice citric bouquet and a hint of lemon flavour that distinguishes it from other light lagers.'
  4. 'The strong citric smell of lemon lingered from his drink, averting him from the worries even for just a little while.'
  5. 'A tartar of salmon and scallops was bound with a finely judged, faintly citric emulsion which countered the extreme richness of the meat.'
  6. 'She sprayed her neck a bit of citric scent and took a peppermint tablet.'
  7. 'You are immediately struck by the subtle scent of, well, oranges - a sensation caused by the burning of citric oils.'
  8. 'The most common citric fruits are grapefruit, orange, lime, pineapple, and tomato.'
  9. 'Toe-curlingly fresh, the wash is ablaze with tart apple and citric zing.'
  10. 'Crab salad didn't have the citric flash it had greeted us with at lunch.'

Definitions

1. of or derived from citric acid.

More examples(as adjective)

"fruits can be citric."

"acides can be citric."

Origin

Late 18th century: from Latin citrus ‘citron tree’ + -ic.