Adjective "circumscribing" definition and examples

(Circumscribing may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈsəːkəmskrʌɪb/

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Definitions and examples

verb

Restrict (something) within limits.
  1. 'Apart from forest controls, colonial regulations sharply circumscribed elephant hunting and ivory procurement at the turn of the century.'
  2. 'In the cold war, conventional doctrine held that the fear of mutual destruction would forever circumscribe escalation beyond the conventional battlefield.'
  3. 'The practice is severely circumscribed and tightly regulated.'
  4. 'Conversations about race in this country are circumscribed enough as it is, so I'm very uneasy with suggesting further constraints.'
  5. 'The Egyptian system has allowed a carefully circumscribed amount of competition for legislative seats.'
  6. 'Both these bills use the pretext of real traumas to circumscribe freedom of opinion.'
  7. 'It was a period when French cinema was strictly circumscribed by the German occupiers and consisted largely of boulevard comedies.'
  8. 'Our civilian justice system has taken the view that the police should be carefully circumscribed in their ability to question suspects.'
  9. 'France will soon be setting new and controversial standards in circumscribing citizens' rights.'
  10. 'A political party is a team of individuals circumscribed by very similar parameters.'
Draw (a figure) round another, touching it at points but not cutting it.
  1. 'The same circle circumscribes both the pentagon of the dodecahedron.'

More definitions

1. to draw a line around; encircle: to circumscribe a city on a map.

2. to enclose within bounds; limit or confine, especially narrowly: Her social activities are circumscribed by school regulations.

3. to mark off; define; delimit: to circumscribe the area of a science.

4. Geometry. to draw (a figure) around another figure so as to touch as many points as possible. (of a figure) to enclose (another figure) in this manner.|-

More examples(as adjective)

"influences can be circumscribing."

Origin

(circumscribe)Late Middle English: from Latin circumscribere, from circum ‘around’ + scribere ‘write’.