Adjective "circulate" definition and examples

(Circulate may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈsəːkjʊleɪt/

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Definitions and examples

verb

Move continuously or freely through a closed system or area.
  1. with object 'the fan circulates hot air around the oven'
  2. 'To truly loop or recur, the message or information needs eventually to circulate back through the system toward its originary point.'
  3. 'But some testosterone remains freely circulating in the bloodstream.'
  4. 'Central heating systems are equipped with a fan that constantly circulates the air in the area being heated.'
  5. 'These and the deeper tunnels form a ram system that circulates gases.'
  6. 'An air pump circulates a continuous flow of air through the device, replacing any air that is lost through the surface's pores.'
  7. 'The company makes mattresses from visco-elastic foam with an open-cell structure that allows air to circulate freely.'
  8. 'There may be 20,000 different proteins circulating in the blood, but few tests link any one of them decisively to a cancer.'
  9. 'It is tempting to think the virus does not circulate in my social group.'
  10. 'A titer test doesn't measure immunity, but it does measure antibodies circulating in the system.'
  11. 'Some rogue pathogens seem to be freely circulating in that county.'
  12. 'We go to a restaurant and eat, and circulate to chat with other locals, trying to make a plan.'
Pass from place to place or person to person.
  1. with object 'they were circulating the list to conservation groups'
  2. 'I want to ask you about the video that has been circulating in the past couple days.'
  3. 'There are also requests circulating via mails.'
  4. 'Outside the official investigation, a different story began to circulate.'
  5. 'Word that a mystery guest speaker would address the Socialist throng around midday began to circulate.'
  6. 'Rumours that an entrepreneur may buy the doomed factory have been circulating among workers and the local business community.'
  7. 'The US dollar not only circulates freely but is positively welcomed in hotels, shops and street markets throughout the country.'
  8. 'Day's paper also looked different from what typically circulated in the coffeehouses and merchant exchanges.'
  9. 'Two different reports circulated about their return to the world of pop.'
  10. 'The Internet is essentially a system for circulating information.'
  11. 'They accused us of being unprofessional in a number of ways, saying that we were responsible for rumors circulating among journalists.'
  12. 'The paper was never published, but it was circulated among training directors.'
  13. 'Flyers urging people to join the mass rally were circulated in the area.'
  14. 'The club had previously circulated letters to the community informing them about the recycling bins.'
  15. 'The school circulated a copy of the letter to parents prior to the Easter holidays.'
  16. 'Why waste taxpayers' money by circulating letters asking for comments only to ignore them when they are offered?'
  17. 'He is circulating a pastoral letter to Catholics in the capital this weekend, laying out his plans for a consultation exercise.'
  18. 'Transport bosses are circulating thousands of copies of a newsletter.'
  19. 'They say the Liberal Democrats have circulated a political leaflet asking people their views on the issue.'
  20. 'My own report on this was circulated a couple of days later.'
  21. 'To advertise the hotline number, posters in Urdu and English will be circulated in Warrington.'

More definitions

1. to move in a circle or circuit; move or pass through a circuit back to the starting point: Blood circulates throughout the body.

2. to pass from place to place, from person to person, etc.: She circulated among her guests.

3. to be distributed or sold, especially over a wide area.

4. Library Science. (of books and other materials) to be available for borrowing by patrons of a library for a specified period of time. verb (used

More examples(as adjective)

"talks can be circulate."

"authors can be circulate."

Origin

Late 15th century (as an alchemical term meaning ‘distil something in a closed container, allowing condensed vapour to return to the original liquid’): from Latin circulat- ‘moved in a circular path’, from the verb circulare, from circulus ‘small ring’ (see circle). circulate (sense 1) dates from the mid 17th century.