Adjective "categorical" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/katəˈɡɒrɪk(ə)l/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Unambiguously explicit and direct.
  1. 'I shall be categorical in saying Simone King will make a worthy MCSG President if elected.'
  2. 'Dr Booth is categorical about how severe the problem of childhood obesity has become.'
  3. 'The answer is a categorical no, except in crofting areas, where a few crofters may be a little better off.'
  4. 'The official answer to the kidnappers has been both categorical and at times confusing.'
  5. 'My defense in this case will not be technical or legalistic: it will be categorical and absolute.'
  6. 'Because if he's now making a categorical statement ruling this out, that would be a shift in his position.'
  7. 'However, he was categorical that he was not attempting to glorify a caste or violence.'
  8. 'And as yet no categorical denial has been forthcoming from Montenegrin authorities.'
  9. 'Both Ms. Rice and Mr. Gonzales gave the required categorical rejection of torture.'
  10. 'Swinney gave a categorical promise never to sanction any more nuclear power stations in Scotland - ever.'

Definitions

1. without exceptions or conditions; absolute; unqualified and unconditional: a categorical denial.

2. Logic. (of a proposition) analyzable into a subject and an attribute related by a copula, as in the proposition “All humans are mortal.”. (of a syllogism) having categorical propositions as premises.

3. of, relating to, or in a category.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be categorical about parties."

"pauls can be categorical about marks."

"parties can be categorical in/at/on yesterdays."

"parties can be categorical in rejections."

"assurances can be categorical."

More examples++

Origin

Late 16th century: from late Latin categoricus (from Greek katēgorikos, from katēgoria ‘statement’: see category)+ -al.