Adjective "captivating" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈkaptɪveɪtɪŋ/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Capable of attracting and holding interest; charming.
  1. 'Nowhere else have I been greeted by so many genuine, captivating smiles.'
  2. 'The sixth piece, which consisted of light string combinations, was the quartet's least captivating performance.'
  3. 'There is a captivating element of juxtaposition in each painting.'
  4. 'In contrast to the opening 45 minutes, the second period proved captivating.'
  5. 'Talk about a story that's just captivating people's attention.'
  6. 'A lot of his article is commonsense, but written in a disarming and captivating manner.'
  7. 'These works maintain a quiet, inviting tone all the more captivating for their utter lack of pretense.'
  8. 'It's a captivating depiction of a way of life very removed from time.'
  9. 'In a captivating section, Bate attempts to reconstruct Shakespeare's library.'
  10. 'Dressed in a white cotton suit Pep reeled the audience in with his captivating voice.'

Definitions

1. to attract and hold the attention or interest of, as by beauty or excellence; enchant: Her blue eyes and red hair captivated him.

2. Obsolete. to capture; subjugate.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be captivating."

"smiles can be captivating."

"people/places/organizations can be captivating."

"experiences can be captivating."

"ways can be captivating."

More examples++

Origin

(captivate)