Adjective "captious" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈkapʃəs/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Tending to find fault or raise petty objections.
  1. 'These are not merely captious theoretical objections.'
  2. 'Now the objector to all of this is charged with being captious, with seeking to impose restraints on activities which lie at the heart of democratic processes.'
  3. 'The McIlhennys bump along the well-trodden tourist path, she captious, he grouchy.'
  4. 'The story is autobiographical, and the tyrannical, captious, arbitrary, and selfish landowner is the author's mother, Varvara Petrovna Turgeneva.'
  5. 'Probably those who engage in such histrionics and captious sophistry, do so because of some driven obsession with the desire to be eternally ‘original’.'
  6. 'He has sworn there is only $1,000 of other debt out there apart from other sundry creditors, so for them to raise really, with respect, captious points about fairness and the like is interesting.'
  7. 'I should withdraw my captious comments.'
  8. 'A rather more captious way of putting your submission seems to be that, and are searching for identity and you do not demonstrate identity by ignoring change.'
  9. 'Is it simply captious to ask, if I had suggested 14 June, whether then it would have been brought back to 31 May?'
  10. 'The book exhibits some of the more unpleasant characteristics of the forensic approach: captious logic-chopping and a tone of arrogant pomposity.'

Definitions

1. apt to notice and make much of trivial faults or defects; faultfinding; difficult to please.

2. proceeding from a faultfinding or caviling disposition: He could never praise without adding a captious remark.

3. apt or designed to ensnare or perplex, especially in argument: captious questions.

More examples(as adjective)

"throats can be captious."

"people can be captious."

"parrots can be captious."

"criticisms can be captious."

Origin

Late Middle English (also in the sense ‘intended to deceive someone’): from Old French captieux or Latin captiosus, from captio(n-) ‘seizing’, (figuratively) ‘deceiving’ (see caption).