Adjective "callous" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈkaləs/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Showing or having an insensitive and cruel disregard for others.
  1. 'I don't think I'm a cruel or callous person, and I don't want to think that what happened to me made me into one.'
  2. 'The whole arms business has made top politicians, of both main parties, increasingly callous and insensitive.'
  3. 'This isn't callous and soulless; it can be rich and exciting.'
  4. 'This explains in part why slaves were often brutalized by the callous administration of cruel punishments.'
  5. 'Jasmine felt a deep stab of anger at that callous comment and she glared at him.'
  6. 'By defending his blundering ways, this self-serving little weasel shows callous disregard for that poor little girl.'
  7. 'Under its sugarcoating of carefree decadence lies a remarkably cruel and callous film.'
  8. 'I guess this means I don't need to feel I went wrong somewhere raising someone who has become such a cruel and callous snob?'
  9. 'Certainly, there is no denying that these cruel and callous acts were terrorism.'
  10. 'Why didn't I bombard him with cruel, viciously callous words?'

noun

    Definitions

    1. made hard; hardened.

    2. insensitive; indifferent; unsympathetic: They have a callous attitude toward the sufferings of others.

    3. having a callus; indurated, as parts of the skin exposed to friction. verb (used with or without object)

    4. to make or become hard or callous.

    More examples(as adjective)

    "polices can be callous in treatments."

    "people can be callous."

    "disregards can be callous."

    "killings can be callous."

    "murders can be callous."

    More examples++

    Origin

    Late Middle English (in the Latin sense): from Latin callosus ‘hard-skinned’.