Adjective "brusque" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/brʊsk//bruːsk//brʌsk/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Abrupt or offhand in speech or manner.
  1. 'An accurate formulation of a patient's condition and prognosis is of little value if it is conveyed to the patient in an off hand or brusque way and is too painful to hear.'
  2. 'She headed out, almost blindly towards the market place, heedless of the glances that anyone gave her for her brusque, regal manner.'
  3. 'At sixty-seven, he is slight and wiry, with white hair and sharp blue eyes and a manner that is both brusque and warm.'
  4. 'The staff was treating her in a very brusque and insensitive manner, and I felt the need to show her some warmth and caring.'
  5. 'William seemed to bridle at the brusque manner of questioning, but settled down when Anne gave him a small smile that told him that he should answer.'
  6. 'It's notoriously easy to hit the wrong tone and come off sharp, imperious or brusque in e-mail when you don't intend to.'
  7. 'Nor can you claim for a moment that they are rude, or brusque.'
  8. 'Equally, the United manager may possibly be one of the few figures down south who can speak to referees in such a brusque, accusatory manner and not incur their wrath.'
  9. 'With her plaid shirt and brusque manners, she is so caught up in her own family traumas she can't branch out for herself.'
  10. 'It was a brusque apology, short and almost snappy, but it was genuine.'

Definitions

1. abrupt in manner; blunt; rough: A brusque welcome greeted his unexpected return.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be brusque in/at/on mornings."

"people can be brusque with people."

"doctors can be brusque in analyses."

"people can be brusque."

"manners can be brusque."

More examples++

Origin

Mid 17th century: from French, ‘lively, fierce’, from Italian brusco ‘sour’.