Adjective "bore" definition and examples

(Bore may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/bɔː/

Advertisement

Definitions and examples

verb

Make (a hole) in something with a tool or by digging.
  1. no object 'the drill can bore through rock'
  2. 'Feric adapted a drill so that it could bore two holes allowing the probe to seat.'
  3. 'A restoration company removed all the carpets in the single-story, ranch-style home, and holes were bored to dry out the walls.'
  4. 'It bored two drill holes within the licence area but some distance from the Rob Roy field, hoping to find oil which would have been in a new field, but without success.'
  5. 'He was staring at a tree that the rock had bored a hole through.'
  6. 'Your theory is that it might have been a whistleblower on the staff who did not break and enter the premises, was lawfully on the premises, but bored a hole, which you say may or may not be a break and enter.'
  7. 'Just below it, an eight-inch hole was bored through the door and a ventilation fan installed.'
  8. 'In the cooler confectionery room Jay bored holes into oranges with a root-cutter.'
  9. 'It was said that the train bored a hole in the mountain's stomach and rushed through it.'
  10. 'It bored four holes from the top of the hill to its base to allow sensitive recording equipment to be lowered inside the mound to provide a 3D image of the hill.'
  11. 'They ripped out the palace walls to lay electrical wiring, and they bored holes for the aerial cables.'
  12. 'an 1100 cc road bike bored out to 1168 cc'
  13. 'It should do well in traditionally bored barrels and less so in over-bored barrels.'
  14. 'The barrel is bored out and threaded at breech and muzzle to accept a 17-cal. barrel liner.'
  15. 'They used a microchip etching process to bore channels just 20 micrometres wide.'
(of an athlete or racehorse) push another competitor out of the way.
  1. 'As the frontrunners sprinted home, Miller's horse bore out just enough to allow Brickell to fit between.'
  2. 'Keane's mastery of the holding role in midfield gave the Reds the chance to go out and attack Olympiakos, contradicting the notion that they will have to bore in order to succeed.'

noun

The hollow part inside a gun barrel or other tube.
  1. 'Even a small amount of snow, mud, excess lubricant, or grease in the bore can dangerously increase pressure and cause the barrel to bulge or burst when firing.'
  2. 'To get a revolver to shoot heart-shaped groups involves a complex relationship of bullets to throats to barrel bores and crowns.'
  3. 'Plus, the perfect bore of the new barrel would assure topnotch accuracy.'
  4. 'The inside bore might be 12 in, but the barrels are well over a metre in diameter at the base.'
  5. 'Pistol or revolver barrels sometimes have a small ring in the bore caused by getting a bullet stuck and then shooting again.'
  6. 'Being parallel to the bore, the rails offered a mounting solution that aimed the light perfectly.'
  7. 'Barrels have ventilated ribs, hard-chromed bores, interchangeable choke tubes (three provided) and lengthened forcing cones to reduce recoil.'
  8. 'The reasoning behind this is that the bores of even the finest match barrels, no matter how smooth they appear, contain surface pores that need to be carefully filled with jacket material.'
  9. 'This is a local narrowing of the bore of the tube.'
  10. 'Most of the accidents I've seen involve a simple bulged barrel due to shooting with an obstruction in the bore.'
  11. 'a small-bore rifle'
  12. 'In patients recovering from a stroke who need feeding, a fine bore, soft feeding tube can be passed down under radiological guidance.'
  13. 'Two 0.315 bore country-made pistols and two cartridges each were recovered.'
  14. 'In its shotgun line, it has added a 28 gauge and .410 bore to its series.'
  15. 'Both are very large, stainless-steel, semi-auto big bore handguns.'
  16. 'It can serve as a shotgun, an accurate big bore rifle, a handgun, and even as a flare gun.'
  17. 'In recent days, they have been peppered with them as if they were buckshot from a 12-bore.'
  18. 'The traditional .22 rifle has been replaced by a choice of Browning automatic handgun or sawn-off 12 bore shotgun.'
  19. 'Let's just say a 12-bore is a noisy weapon in a confined space.'
  20. 'At some point he armed himself with a 12-bore pump action shotgun which was capable of holding up to 5 cartridges, and loaded the gun.'
  21. 'He allegedly claimed he had a 12-bore shotgun and threatened officers, a bailiff and officials after they turned up to throw him out.'
  1. 'The chairman, Senator Moylan, proposed that the board carry out some test bores to establish that ground conditions are favourable for construction work.'
  2. 'The firm wanted to eliminate building mandatory escape cross tunnels between bores, a job requiring tricky ground freezing, says Harnois.'
  3. 'Last summer BT began legal action in the US against six companies concerning patents for blowing fibre optic cables down bores and conduits.'

    More definitions

    1. to weary by dullness, tedious repetition, unwelcome attentions, etc.: The long speech bored me. noun

    2. a dull, tiresome, or uncongenial person.

    3. a cause of ennui or petty annoyance: repetitious tasks that are a bore to do.

    More examples(as adjective)

    "moves can be bore to dollars."

    "moves can be bore."

    Origin

    (bore)Old English borian (verb), of Germanic origin; related to German bohren.