Adjective "bold" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/bəʊld/

Definitions and examples

adjective

(of a person, action, or idea) showing a willingness to take risks; confident and courageous.
  1. 'no journalist was bold enough to take on the Prime Minister'
  2. 'But Brian, I'd like you to consider a bold suggestion.'
  3. 'In its first national advertising campaign, Infinite Spirits took a bold risk.'
  4. 'Anything lowering their chances of being spotted by Liches sounded like a good idea, so the tension at Raven's bold suggestion quickly subsided.'
  5. 'Yet because we yearn to be seen as bold, brave and courageous, we'll take stupid risks to prove our worth.'
  6. 'Without them and their bold thoughts Keighley would not be what it is today.'
  7. 'Judge Jones was a bankruptcy lawyer and an authority on business law, but has perhaps received more attention for her bold opinions on social issues and criminal law.'
  8. 'It's a bold concept, but one that's smartly conveyed by its paintings and hypnotic jingle.'
  9. 'The others, who had gathered to discuss the problem, gasped in shock at such a bold suggestion.'
  10. 'Most were young, hardy, physically fit, courageous, fearless, bold, endowed with fortitude and endurance, and ever ready for a fight.'
  11. 'To say it is a bold idea is not to say that it's new.'
  12. 'Whatever bold words she wished to say to her would have to remain behind a careful mouth.'
  13. 'I believe that such feelings will not be considered bold presumption but an act of love.'
  14. 'With a shrug, Lenore plopped down on the tiny chair of her table, crossing her legs in a bold manner.'
  15. 'Like a bold boy at a children's party, he still insists on being the centre of attention even though it's not his birthday.'
(of a colour, design, or shape) having a strong, vivid, or clear appearance.
  1. 'He has composed a series of townships scenes in flat planes of bright and bold colours that clamour for attention.'
  2. 'Bright colours and clear bold graphics make the menu practical and aesthetically pleasing.'
  3. 'In Spain he created abstract work featuring vivid colors and bold lines.'
  4. 'His symbolism is strong and his colours are bold.'
  5. 'The Romans called them the ‘painted people’, and the Celtic love of colour is obvious in the bold designs on their floors and walls.'
  6. 'They are bold shapes; strong blocks of colour defined by thick black lines and veiled with subtle, intricate patterns of feathers, scales and seashells.'
  7. 'The end product is a strong, vibrant painting in bold colours with a wealth of detail capturing the jumble of roofs and chimneys.'
  8. 'Just make sure the colors you choose fit with the bold hues of your design.'
  9. 'Facing west is a bold design of a fourfold leaf with a tiny, barely noticeable face in the centre.'
  10. 'Using a brush and a matchstick to paint his decoys, Bergman achieved a unique balance between vivid colors, bold lines, and scratch painting.'
  11. 'cross references are printed in bold type'
  12. 'Subheadings within chapters are in bold type for easy chapter outlining.'
  13. 'Predictions of exceptionally high tides are given in bold type.'
  14. 'The differences from the previously reported sequences are in bold type'
  15. 'Significant differences are shown in bold type.'
  16. 'The sites associated with the separation between Ethiopia and Europe are also given in bold type.'
  17. 'Only what is in bold type above was quoted in the evidence to the Court.'
  18. 'Paragraph 3 has a footnote at the end in bold type.'
  19. 'As if to emphasise the point, the report prints the comment in bold type.'
  20. 'Kelman reproduces it, with the cut portions in bold type, emphasising only what a good job was made of editing it.'
  21. 'I emphasize the translated word in question in bold type.'

noun

A bold typeface or letter.
  1. 'Numbers in bold at the beginning of each specimen's name are sample numbers.'
  2. 'You must include the ‘code’ indicated in bold in order for your meta tags to work.'
  3. 'Pages not for public dissemination should be annotated in bold at the bottom with the reserved term ‘classified.’'
  4. 'Start putting keyword phrases in bold in the second paragraph.'
  5. 'The links are very easily read, the headlines are concise, and the use of bold in the copy allows for skimming without interfering with reading.'

Definitions

1. not hesitating or fearful in the face of actual or possible danger or rebuff; courageous and daring: a bold hero.

2. not hesitating to break the rules of propriety; forward; impudent: He apologized for being so bold as to speak to the emperor.

3. necessitating courage and daring; challenging: a bold adventure.

4. beyond the usual limits of conventional thought or action; imaginative: Einstein was a bold mathematician. a difficult problem needing a bold

More examples(as adjective)

"investors can be bold in/at/on weeks."

"governments can be bold to hikes."

"organizations can be bold in objectives."

"moves can be bold by standards."

"visions can be bold in colours."

More examples++

Origin

Old English bald, of Germanic origin; related to Dutch boud and to German bald ‘soon’.

Phrase

be (or make) so bold (as to do something)
(as) bold as brass
a bold stroke