Adjective "blush" definition and examples

(Blush may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/blʌʃ/

Definitions and examples

verb

Show shyness, embarrassment, or shame by becoming red in the face.
  1. with complement 'Kate felt herself blushing scarlet'
  2. 'Well at least he thought she was blushing, the colour on her face was so varied it was hard to tell.'
  3. 'I blushed further shades of embarrassment, trying to hide myself under my raven dark hair.'
  4. 'Tom humbly bowed his head and his cheeks blushed in the embarrassment.'
  5. 'Jennifer smiled at the way Scott blushed, the red flush working its way up from his neck to the top of his face.'
  6. 'Her friends started clapping loudly, hooting and hollering as Scarlet just blushed.'
  7. 'She blushed a deep scarlet and I couldn't help but grin even more.'
  8. 'She looked down at herself, and blushed so deep a crimson it was easily visible through the white fur on her chest.'
  9. 'He glared at her, and realised with embarrassment that he was blushing, which only made him blush all the more.'
  10. 'Now it was Gabe's turn to squirm and blush as crimson as roses.'
  11. 'Anthony's hand brushed against mine ever so slightly as we were moving to get in, and I blushed a deep scarlet.'
  12. 'I get blushing kidneys in front of urinals if there's someone else within five paces of me.'
  13. 'But then, if financial scandals made you blush, the entire reconstruction of the country would be pretty mortifying.'
  14. 'At one time, any hostess getting ready for a dinner party would blush for shame to think that she had bought her meal from a supermarket.'
Be or become pink or pale red.
  1. 'From a distance, the blossoms look like pink clouds floating over blushing pools of fallen petals.'
  2. 'God knows what you said, but the dust beneath your feet blushed pink.'
  3. 'From Thursday on, the television cameras will beam sumptuous shots of loblolly pines and blushing azaleas around the world.'

noun

A reddening of the face as a sign of shyness, embarrassment, or shame.
  1. 'Their button black eyes looked her over and lingered on certain areas that made her feel very uncomfortable and brought a faint blush to her cheeks.'
  2. 'I felt like an idiot, and she could see the blush of shame in my face.'
  3. 'Some of the comments are priceless and deserve to be preserved, with the hope that they might at some future date bring a blush of shame to the cheeks of the more honorable.'
  4. 'She cried outrageously, a faint blush coming to her cheeks.'
  5. 'That old nick name never went away, bringing a blush to her cheeks every time, it was a sign that her father was happy to see her.'
  6. 'I shook my head, feeling a faint blush on my cheeks.'
  7. 'When she spoke of sexual abuse, a faint blush crept up her cheeks.'
  8. '‘You mean you,’ I pointed out, laughing when a faint blush crossed her cheeks.'
  9. 'I would be mortified cancelling someone who had flown 600 miles to see me, but important men don't sport the blush of shame.'
  10. 'I am not certain what to make of the tune but the video does bring a healthy blush to my cheeks.'
A pink or pale red tinge.
  1. 'Pea-like flowers open to a lavender blush, then mellow to buff yellow and will perfume the garden from midsummer to autumn.'
  2. 'The sun sets with every shade of blush and rose imaginable lacing across the horizon.'
  3. 'A bright hue, a rosy blush, pretty skin that's blemish free, and a plump shape - these are generally key for ripe fruits.'
  4. 'In the Near East white apricots are common, with pale skin and pink blush.'
  5. 'As he sprays reactive chemicals on the test strips, a pink blush spreads across the paper.'
  6. 'As soft as a blush when one is complimented, a pink hue with the warm sweetness of jasmine in a bottle that too is a blush colour yet is more romantic in tone, luminous in feel.'
A wine with a slight pink tint made in the manner of white wine but from red grape varieties.
  1. 'The many new world wines, with the exception of American blush wines, are bolder, fruitier and frequently more alcoholic and should really be included as a third category.'
  2. 'Dry and semi-dry roses or blush wines exhibit fresh and fruity flavors and have a moderately high level of acidity.'
  3. 'She took some fresh tarragon and began tearing the leaves into tiny strips, dropping them into the blush wine that made the base of the marinade.'
  1. 'She put on mascara, navy blue eyeliner, dark blue eye shadow, pale pink lipstick, and pale peach blush.'
  2. 'Remember to swipe an eye shadow or blush brush on the back of your hand before applying.'
  3. 'The pink blush on the models make the whole look ‘prettier’ than the look in the other magazine.'
  4. 'With a little rose shaded lipstick and blush, she had to admit to herself that she looked hot.'
  5. 'The foundation made her look so pale she'd had to use the blush and lipstick to give her face some color.'
  6. 'Stick to powder blushes as well; cream formulas tend to make oily skin look even greasier.'
  7. 'The lipsticks, eye shadows, blushes and translucent powder in this kit will help transform your looks in no time.'
  8. 'No blush or pink cheeks, she knew she would already be blushing by herself later on.'
  9. 'Look for a great flat-top blush brush, like this one, for a really natural look.'
  10. 'Skip blush and allow a bit of the skin's pink color to shine through on your cheeks.'

More definitions

1. to redden, as from embarrassment or shame: He blushed when they called him a conquering hero.

2. to feel shame or embarrassment (often followed by at or for): Your behavior makes me blush for your poor mother.

3. (of the sky, flowers, etc.) to become rosy.

4. (of new house paint or lacquer) to become cloudy or dull through moisture or excessive evaporation of solvents. verb (used with object)

5. to make red; flush.

6. to make known by a blush: She co

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be blush with prides."

"people can be blush."

Origin

Old English blyscan; related to modern Dutch blozen.

Phrase

at first blush
spare (or save) someone's blushes