Adjective "blowsy" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈblaʊzi/

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Definitions and examples

adjective

(of a woman) coarse, untidy, and red-faced.
  1. figurative 'blowsy, old-fashioned roses'
  2. 'The actress is as irritating as she is perfect in the role of feckless and blowsy Kathy who loses her house after a mix up with local taxes.'
  3. 'And that woman, that blowsy, strident woman who insists on telling everybody what she thinks of them.'
  4. 'The gaunt actress looks more like a heroin addict than the blowzy drunk he had in mind (read the text - it's not just my mental image of the character that she doesn't fit).'
  5. 'However, in place of the suggestive delicacy of traditional ink painting, his bees and butterflies are realized with the blowsy directness of American Pop art.'
  6. 'The actress, as the blowsy, chain - smoking dance teacher, is sadly underused.'
  7. 'He meekly obeys when he is told by this blowsy female partner to take a small child on a visit to his mother in a distant town.'
  8. 'On the other side, a blowsy woman in peasant garb leans back on a swing, revealing a full view up her petticoats.'
  9. 'She's among the most sought-after strumpets on the scene, a brash and blowsy blonde babe whose sassy strip-club allure promises to be on the scene for some time to come.'
  10. 'Hector thought she looked blowsy, her primness hoisted for the Missionaries squirreled away again.'
  11. 'The staging in Act I uses a trio of boxes for separate scenes - the kitchen, a ballet studio for the blowsy stepsisters' dancing lesson, a frame for the Seasons divertissement.'

Definitions

1. having a coarse, ruddy complexion.

2. disheveled in appearance; unkempt.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be blowsy as harridans."

"people can be blowsy."

"foxgloves can be blowsy."

"flowers can be blowsy."

Origin

Early 17th century: from obsolete blowze ‘beggar's female companion’, of unknown origin.