Adjective "blanketed" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈblaŋkɪt/

Definitions and examples

noun

A large piece of woollen or similar material used as a covering on a bed or elsewhere for warmth.
  1. 'I'm convalescing amidst the warmth of piled blankets and the hiss of the radiator.'
  2. 'Her whole body was suddenly covered in the warmth as if a blanket had just been pulled over her.'
  3. 'Not even a hand had snuck out from under the cozy warmth of the blankets.'
  4. 'She swung her legs over the side of the bed, and threw off her down blanket.'
  5. 'After cuddling in the cozy warmth of her blankets for several minutes, Abbey got out of bed and slipped her feet into her silk slippers.'
  6. 'Quickly she snuggled back into the warmth of the blankets.'
  7. 'Remove cushions and soft toys, and buy bedding made from synthetic fabric rather than using feather pillows and woollen blankets.'
  8. 'It was the kind of warmth like pulling blankets out of the dryer and wrapping them around you in the middle of winter.'
  9. 'Actually, there wasn't much to make, all she had to do was puff the pillow and throw the blanket over the bed.'
  10. 'Her teeth are chattering, and I run to get a blanket to throw over her.'
  11. 'a dense grey blanket of cloud'
  12. 'Of all the things I did not expect to be a factor in my morning commute, I woke to the thickest blanket of fog ever.'
  13. 'The low temperatures, combined with the thick blanket of dust surrounding the embryonic star, means the process of star creation cannot presently be measured.'
  14. 'Unfortunately for all the fans, a thick blanket of fog rolled in making it impossible to see.'
  15. 'The corridor is usually full of people puffing away and a thick blanket of smoke hangs in the air.'
  16. 'The sky was gray, a blanket of clouds hanging in the sky, the beginnings of autumn chill in the barest puff of a breeze.'
  17. 'The sky outside was still wrapped in the thick blanket of nighttime.'
  18. 'Showering and dressing, still in a dream, we looked with horror out of the window and saw a thick blanket of fog hiding the street.'
  19. 'The stars were hidden behind a thick blanket of clouds only revealed in brief patches.'
  20. 'The sky was completely covered by a thick blanket of clouds.'
  21. 'Outside, dim diffuse light indicated the presence of dawn, but everything was shrouded in a thick blanket of mist.'
A rubber surface used for transferring the image in ink from the plate to the paper in offset printing.

    adjective

    Covering all cases or instances; total and inclusive.
    1. 'The government decided to put a blanket ban on all foreign adoptions so no one outside can adopt a foreign child.'
    2. 'The health minister plans to include pubs in a blanket ban on smoking in the workplace.'
    3. 'My first step will be to remove the insect killer tubelight setup on each floor, and issue a blanket ban on all insect repellants.'
    4. 'The director of the civil rights group said blanket bans cause unacceptable breaches of innocent people's human rights.'
    5. 'They are compiling a list of skating no-go areas around the parish - and a blanket ban on skateboarding in unsociable hours is also being put forward.'
    6. 'The association chairman said only a complete blanket ban on smoking in pubs would work.'
    7. 'What will the impact of a blanket ban be?'
    8. 'In the 1960s, most countries imposed blanket speed limits.'
    9. 'Licensees say there is no support for a blanket ban that would devastate the city's £200m-a-year night time economy.'
    10. 'But a blanket ban serves only to prevent the public from knowing what really happened last week.'

    verb

    Cover completely with a thick layer of something.
    1. 'Several inches had fallen since it began late the previous night, and the outside of the train station was blanketed in a layer of white.'
    2. 'A thick, dark layer of smoke is blanketing much of Los Angeles and still the cause of the fire is unknown.'
    3. 'He gave one pull, and the entire floor was blanketed in utter blackness.'
    4. 'The area was blanketed in an icy fog and the road was slushy from an early morning snowfall.'
    5. 'The photo reveals a thick layer of dust blanketing the floor and wall of the summit crater atop the tall volcano.'
    6. 'The town was blanketed in thick black smoke after arsonists set fire to material in the long awaited new hospital extension.'
    7. 'With all its grandeur, the place was blanketed in an age-old sorrow.'
    8. 'When the forest floor is blanketed in snow, the birds use their powerful bills to dig out ant nests from tree trunks and tree bases.'
    9. 'A blinding coat of white blanketed the thick shrubbery that defined my garden.'
    10. 'The stage is blanketed in darkness until a shadowy figure comes out with a glowing candle in one hand.'
    11. 'the double glazing blankets the noise a bit'
    12. 'It is not unusual to see the fish finder screen showing the hard echo of the wreck blanketed by fish both up and downtide of the wreck.'
    Take wind from the sails of (another craft) by passing to windward.
    1. 'When you spike the tack shackle the pressure is completely released from the sail and the sail is blanketed behind the mainsail.'

    Definitions

    1. a large, rectangular piece of soft fabric, often with bound edges, used especially for warmth as a bed covering.

    2. a similar piece of fabric used as a covering for a horse, dog, etc.

    3. the chief garment traditionally worn by some American Indians.

    4. any extended covering or layer: a blanket of snow.

    5. Printing. (in a press for offset printing) the rubber-covered cylinder to which an inked impression is transferred from the plate for transfer directly to the paper. (in a press

    More examples(as adjective)

    "parts can be blanketed."

    "peninsulas can be blanketed."

    "muchs can be blanketed."

    "tables can be blanketed."

    "sides can be blanketed."

    More examples++

    Origin

    (blanket)Middle English (denoting undyed woollen cloth): via Old Northern French from Old French blanc ‘white’, ultimately of Germanic origin.