Adjective "biscuit" definition and examples

(Biscuit may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈbɪskɪt/

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Definitions and examples

noun

A small baked unleavened cake, typically crisp, flat, and sweet.
  1. 'Not only that, it's an opportunity to find decorations, tins of biscuits, liqueur chocolates etc, and all the other bits and pieces that you cannot find anywhere else.'
  2. 'The packaging is a little odd, but once you get in there the biscuits are crisp and delicate and the chocolate is good.'
  3. 'Instead of high-fat foods like chocolate, biscuits, cakes and crisps, try healthier alternatives such as fresh fruit, crusty bread or crackers.'
  4. 'The Salvation Army says it would welcome any food that would keep, such as chocolates, sweets, biscuits, mince pies and selection boxes.'
  5. 'Just over half of men and women eat chocolates, crisps or biscuits daily, though the figure is much higher for children.'
  6. 'Following the event the school students retired to the community centre where they feasted on sweets, chocolates and biscuits.'
  7. 'Jon sounded very business-like and Chantal watched him as he purchased some sort of steaming biscuit, refusing his offer to buy her one as well.'
  8. 'Mounds of unfinished mashed potatoes smeared around one with gravy and butter, half eaten biscuit adrift in a sea of peach cobbler.'
  9. 'Pillsbury in turn, will offer 55 cents off two cans of Hormel Chili and 40 cents off four biscuit packs.'
  10. 'We all had eggs, bacon, potatoes, biscuit, and coffee.'
  11. 'For dessert I was immediately drawn to the nectarines, which were slow-roasted with vanilla, served with creme fraiche and a puff pastry biscuit.'
  12. 'I inquired as I slathered cream onto my biscuit.'
  13. 'Arriving there, I did what I usually did on a normal day: got a quick biscuit for breakfast and headed to my first class, namely English.'
  14. 'The cheese may have migrated from the centre of Marie's biscuit, but Rampling is in full control of her faculties here.'
  15. 'Still, a tradition is a tradition, so I'll be picking up a three-piece w / biscuit from the Turnpike rest stop Roy Rogers on my way home.'
Porcelain or other pottery which has been fired but not glazed.
  1. 'She says that at present, students are able to learn, experiment and practice with the preparation of clay and hand-making techniques for biscuit and glaze firing.'
  2. 'The Sevres biscuit figures in Plate VIII, which bear the incised mark of Bachelier, show how such studies were ultimately translated into objects.'
  3. 'At first his slip painting on biscuit porcelain simply peeled off.'
A light brown colour.
  1. 'Moss, chocolate, mink, charcoal, biscuit and olive dominated the white expanse of winter for Grachvogel, as jazz drifted from a grand piano on the catwalk.'
  2. 'If you don't want to go beyond white, update your color with tone-on-tone neutrals like ecru, oyster, almond or biscuit.'
  3. 'Available in sizes S - 4X in black, midnight navy, smoke and biscuit.'
A small flat piece of wood used to join two larger pieces of wood together, fitting into slots in each.
  1. 'Using thin wood wafers called biscuits can strengthen wood joints by providing more glue bonding area.'
  2. 'Biscuits turn what would ordinarily be a weak butt joint into a very strong connection.'

More definitions

1. a kind of bread in small, soft cakes, raised with baking powder or soda, or sometimes with yeast; scone.

2. Chiefly British. a dry and crisp or hard bread in thin, flat cakes, made without yeast or other raising agent; a cracker. a cookie.

3. a pale-brown color.

4. Also called bisque. Ceramics. unglazed earthenware or porcelain after firing.

5. Also called preform. a piece of plastic or the like, prepared for pressing into a phonograph record. adjective

6. having the color bis

More examples(as adjective)

"sales can be biscuit."

"bars can be biscuit."

Origin

Middle English: from Old French bescuit, based on Latin bis ‘twice’ + coctus, past participle of coquere ‘to cook’ (so named because originally biscuits were cooked in a twofold process: first baked and then dried out in a slow oven so that they would keep).

Phrase

take the biscuit