Adjective "bipartite" definition and examples

(Bipartite may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/bʌɪˈpɑːtʌɪt/

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Definitions and examples

adjective

Involving or made by two separate parties.
  1. 'With the new law, both employers and workers will be allowed to go to government mediators, conciliators or arbitrators within 30 days if they fail to resolve a dispute at the bipartite level.'
  2. 'Initially, the Labour Party had been prepared to give the bipartite system its chance.'
  3. 'What however the agreement failed to reflect was that the partnership was tripartite and that Mr. Kemp's earlier efforts had been bipartite.'
  4. 'There are different types of guarantees, such as bipartite and tripartite guarantees, continuing and limited guarantees and demand guarantees.'
  5. 'But an ‘Ivy League’ plus the rest sounds uncomfortably like the old bipartite system of grammar and secondary moderns, and it would need careful handling to avoid creating a political backlash.'
  6. 'Its famous mad scene apart, Lucia is surprisingly Classical, based on a succession of conventional (if beautifully conceived) double arias and bipartite duets.'
  7. 'He traces the inception, and to some extent the dissemination, of the bipartite rural estate to the designs of the Carolingians.'
  8. 'While it is unlikely that a free trade area will be set up between the two nations, the deal is likely to see formal ties of bipartite trade.'
  9. 'A dictatorship is much more sensitive to the frailties of its leader than a bipartite or tripartite system.'
  10. 'When our early medieval documents begin again in the eighth century, however, bipartite divisions are commonly referred to.'
Consisting of two parts.
  1. 'König's work on the factorisation of bipartite graphs relates closely to the marriage problem of Philip Hall.'
  2. 'A red-blue matching is the geometric analogue of bipartite matching in graphs; match up red and blue vertices in pairs to minimize the total cost (= sum of distances).'
  3. 'Also in 1975 Chung published her first joint paper with Ron Graham On multicolor Ramsey numbers for complete bipartite graphs which appeared in the Journal of Combinatorial Theory.'

More definitions

1. divided into or consisting of two parts.

2. Law. being in two corresponding parts: a bipartite contract.

3. shared by two; joint: a bipartite pact; bipartite rule.

4. Botany. divided into two parts nearly to the base, as a leaf.

More examples(as adjective)

"structures can be bipartite."

"systems can be bipartite."

"disputes can be bipartite."

"ups can be bipartite."

"panels can be bipartite."

More examples++

Origin

Late Middle English (in the sense ‘divided into two parts’): from Latin bipartitus, past participle of bipartire, from bi- ‘two’ + partire ‘to part’.