Adjective "bark" definition and examples

(Bark may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/bɑːk/

Definitions and examples

noun

The sharp explosive cry of a dog, fox, or seal.
  1. 'Next thing she knew Poochie was making an uproar of barks and growls.'
  2. 'In general, vocalizations are varied and include: trumpeting, whistles, twitters, honks, barks, grunts, quacks, croaks and growls.'
  3. 'The dogs outside went into a flurry of barks and snarls, and we both looked up.'
  4. 'The bark of seals drowns out the din of the city you left behind, and at night the canal's placid silence is just what you need to decompress.'
  5. 'As soon as the click of key-in-lock was heard Melanie's sharp barks followed.'
  6. 'It was something in-between a bark and a growl and leaned strongly towards a snarl.'
  7. 'The pup stopped in front of him, and gave a sharp bark.'
  8. 'We're greeted by a chorus of excited barks and yelps.'
  9. 'Most of the wolves were nodding to each other and conversing in wolf speech, which consisted mostly of growls, grunts, barks and howls.'
  10. 'Every second, even when the dog disappeared from view, I could hear its barks and growls.'
  11. 'The guys all elicited little coughs to hide their barks of laughter especially after they saw the look on Chantal's face.'
  12. 'I know some can feel D's pain when he lays it down about his love for the streets, but every time he screams, yells, howls and barks, I lose patience.'
  13. 'He guides you to long satisfying laughs or giddy giggles, while the rest of the cast scares you into sharp barks of laughter.'
  14. 'A small bark of a laugh escaped the Freeman's lips, so close to her ear, yet his grip about her body only increased slightly.'
  15. 'After possibly hours of escaping, the heavy thundering of steps and short, barks of orders ended.'
  16. 'With a sharp bark, Rush pulled away from the other robot, transforming into jet mode as he did so.'
  17. 'Eve grabbed the door handle, turned it, then let out a bark of a laugh.'
  18. 'Her face looks like thunder from the moment she gets up and any conversation is said in short barks.'
  19. 'Then JacobGoldGotti would laugh - a humorless bark that made everyone uneasy.'
  20. 'She laughed then, her barks ringing among the trees.'

verb

(of a dog, fox, or seal) give a bark.
  1. 'Dogs barked at the distance, greeting each other and saying farewell.'
  2. 'The puppies barked at me, they wanted it back, and they were angry!'
  3. 'His older brother, Karl, was in the house but did not realise anything was wrong until he heard the dog barking.'
  4. 'The wild dogs started barking and baring their teeth.'
  5. 'A mass of dogs rush out barking, jumping up against the car.'
  6. 'Neighbours found him after they heard the family dog barking repeatedly.'
  7. 'The dog barked at the cat and made to steal the cat's food.'
  8. 'At one point you could hear Laci's dog barking in the background.'
  9. 'She said: ‘At about 4am, my boyfriend woke up and the dog started barking.’'
  10. 'The dog barked at the girl, baring it's canines threateningly at her.'
  11. 'she barked with laughter'
  12. 'The crowd barked, growled and occasionally molested one another.'
  13. 'So we're staying at the Waldorf which is crammed with business people barking into mobile phones.'
  14. 'Got a surprise ‘Yow’ from the Angry Dawg a moment ago, he was barking from the office.'
  15. 'In one small room a grey-haired jobsworth barked angrily at three tourists who'd dared to point their fingers too close to a minor masterpiece.'
  16. 'The responding officer barks back, with the concern of a man who could be absorbing a bullet in the chest.'
  17. '‘I hear people coming up the stairs,’ Jack barked as the half dragged Motoko to the door.'
  18. 'The new lawyer barks rudely at the old lawyer and the judge.'
  19. 'It's probably the same feeling that people in Guantánamo Bay have, having had soldiers barking at them in English for two years.'
Utter (a command or question) abruptly or aggressively.
  1. with direct speech '‘Nobody is allowed up here,’ he barked'
  2. 'His boss is a brutish oaf who barks orders and commands with little care for his employee's dignity.'
  3. 'But since she's a woman, barking orders left and right, she's suddenly a bad person.'
  4. 'There was a brief pause before another question was barked with a peculiar undertone to it.'
  5. 'Soon the dazed POWs heard strange voices barking commands in English.'
  6. 'I'm halfway to my seat when the substitute teacher barks at me, ‘Sit down, sir!’'
  7. 'They're the only ones allowed to look sensible and informed as they bark questions at shifty politicians.'
  8. '‘Suck it up and get back on the trail,’ the director barked.'
  9. 'Kojiro never did anything except scream and yell and bark orders at everyone he came in contact with.'
  10. 'Adrian was at my side barking a command of his own.'
  11. 'Then, Leslie barked some command, and we all started doing ‘side steps’.'
  12. 'As the band lets the dueling guitars heat up, Johnson barks like a flea market pitchman, bargaining with wary shoppers for humanism and attention.'
  13. 'A"Step right up to the Shootin' Corral fellas, first shot's for free!" he had barked in a greasy rasp at cringing fair-goers who tried to creep by his booth unnoticed,'

noun

A ship or boat.
  1. 'If this journey included a trip on the Nile, the golden barque was put on a papyriform transport boat and taken to its destination.'

More definitions

1. the abrupt, harsh, explosive cry of a dog.

2. a similar sound made by another animal, as a fox.

3. a short, explosive sound, as of firearms: the bark of a revolver.

4. a brusque order, reply, etc.: The foreman's bark sent the idlers back to their machines.

5. a cough. verb (used without object)

6. (of a dog or other animal) to utter an abrupt, explosive cry or a series of such cries.

7. to make a similar sound: The big guns barked.

8. to speak or cry out sharply or g

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be bark."

"dogs can be bark."

"blues can be bark."

Origin

(bark)Late Middle English: variant of barque.

Phrase

someone's bark is worse than their bite
be barking up the wrong tree