Adjective "baited" definition and examples

(Baited may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/beɪt/

Definitions and examples

noun

Food placed on a hook or in a net, trap, or fishing area to entice fish or other animals as prey.
  1. count noun 'fishing with live baits'
  2. 'One fish took my entire bait off the hook with no problem.'
  3. 'The hotel caters for many avid fishers, and can store bait and fishing rods for Dave and Deirdre.'
  4. 'They took a sailfish on live fish bait suspended approximately 20 feet below the surface at 11: 10 in the morning.'
  5. 'This fish is commonly used for bait in the fishing industry.'
  6. 'The fishing in turbulent, sandy water usually is best on natural bait fished with a big rig and heavy weight near bottom.'
  7. 'Quickly and happily, I went back to the truck to grab my fishing rod and some bait.'
  8. 'The possum industry would trap or use cyanide-laden bait so that the animals could be recovered and used.'
  9. 'The saltwater fisherman drifting a natural bait on a circle hook can free-spool several counts of line, then throw the reel in gear and point the rod at the fish.'
  10. 'Most are small, less than three or four feet, but occasionally a pier or jetty angler soaking a big bait hooks a fish with real shoulders.'
  11. 'Since when has the colour of the weights we use stopped the fish eating our bait?.'
  12. 'Asked how good a player Carter might become, he refuses to take the bait, and issues a warning instead.'
  13. 'He was smart enough by now not to take the bait and sighed as he pulled into a parking spot.'
  14. 'And after a few days of dangling it in front of you like bait, which you were all smart enough not to jump at, he never did call her.'
  15. 'King didn't take the bait, but he was assassinated two years later in Memphis.'
  16. 'I believe this is a red herring that has worked well in past arguments and you keep hoping for someone to take the bait once again.'
  17. 'Not that he would ever actually be elected PM, but you know what I mean - there's not even the potential for it if he won't take the bait, right?'
  18. 'She was tossing me bait, like she had for years, but this time I didn't want it.'
  19. 'If only they knew that the only way to prevent this happening is if they didn't take the bait.'
  20. 'If you're inclined to take the bait, proceed with caution.'
  21. 'Will the PM's morning radio female Piranha take the bait?'

    verb

    Deliberately annoy or taunt (someone)
    1. 'When was the last time you had blatant race baiting?'
    2. 'Even to those who consistently disagree with and bait me, I appreciate your comments and thoughts because you keep me thinking.'
    3. 'The younger girl wondered if Sanura was baiting her, teasing her like she always did, or if she knew what she was really saying to Kira.'
    4. 'He came into office promising Black Power in the city, then made a career out of gratuitous race baiting and thumbing his nose at the white suburbs.'
    5. 'But, I probably wouldn't expect to avoid it if I baited and insulted a bunch of great big thugs who hold a different political point of view.'
    6. 'In soccer it has nearly become acceptable to bait opposing fans, to chant and jeer at the other team's followers.'
    7. 'All of this happened while he endured endless taunting and baiting by racist opponents and hostile crowds and frigid responses from some of his own teammates.'
    8. 'He was trying to help some of his female German fellow workers who were being harassed and baited with cries of ‘work-shy Turks’.'
    9. 'Dante couldn't help baiting and rubbing her face in her partner's betrayal.'
    10. 'My government actually has to bait people with catchy song in order to do the thing that should be a civic duty.'
    11. 'people who bait badgers'
    12. 'And characteristics desired at earlier times for fighting and baiting purposes were exaggerated so that the unfortunate dog became unhappily abnormal.'
    13. 'Fife Constabulary's wildlife crime officer described baiting, specially trained dogs being set on badgers, as brutally vicious.'
    14. 'Most think that it refers to the fact that an albino bear was baited here.'
    15. 'The badgers are baited by terriers and those who watch them bet large amounts of money on which terrier will put up the best fight against the badger.'
    16. 'Bull owners pride themselves on making their animals as aggressive as possible either by baiting them or feeding them large quantities of arrack, the local firewater.'
    17. 'In the Middle Ages they were used to chase wild boar, to bait bulls and were also used as bodyguards.'
    18. 'They also kill badgers as well by something called baiting, but I don't know much about that.'
    Put bait on (a hook) or in (a trap, net, or fishing area) to entice fish or animals.
    1. 'What would it feel like to bait a hook with one of these animals, and reel in a fifty-pound largemouth?'
    2. 'The time to respond to requests for block baiting, which is Chicago's term for setting out baited glue-board traps for alley rats, has doubled since 2001.'
    3. 'Every time one of her grandkids goes fishing and baits a hook the way Grandma taught them to do, her immortality is assured.'
    4. 'Wall text explains that Joo rigged a camera inside an embalmed caribou carcass, left it in the woods baited with fresh meat and attempted to restart nature's feeding cycles.'
    5. 'The size 1 hair-rigged hook was baited with two standard boilies with a pop-up on top.'
    6. 'The float was locked in position by the bulk shot, with only a number 4 shot about 1ft from the size 8 hook that was baited with a piece of flake.'
    7. 'Before baiting, mow the grass so more bait can reach the trails and burrows used by voles.'
    8. 'Moving quietly into position, the hook was baited with a big chunk of meat.'
    9. 'The hook was baited with two maggots and the tackle fished a few inches over-depth.'
    10. 'A third apple trial was conducted during 2002 in the Moxee apple orchard to examine if oviposition could be stimulated to occur on non-bearing shoots baited with Et-E, Z-DD lures.'

    More definitions

    1. food, or some substitute, used as a lure in fishing, trapping, etc.

    2. a poisoned lure used in exterminating pests.

    3. an allurement; enticement: Employees were lured with the bait of annual bonuses.

    4. an object for pulling molten or liquefied material, as glass, from a vat or the like by adhesion.

    5. South Midland and Southern U.S. a large or sufficient quantity or amount: He fetched a good bait of wood. an excessive quantity or amount.

    6. British Slang. food. verb (u

    More examples(as adjective)

    "hooks can be baited."

    "breaths can be baited."

    "lines can be baited."

    "boxes can be baited."

    "areas can be baited."

    More examples++

    Origin

    (bait)Middle English: from Old Norse beit ‘pasture, food’, beita ‘to hunt or chase’.

    Phrase

    fish or cut bait
    rise to the bait
    with baited breath