Adjective "alibi" definition and examples

(Alibi may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈalɪbʌɪ/

Definitions and examples

noun

A claim or piece of evidence that one was elsewhere when an act, typically a criminal one, is alleged to have taken place.
  1. 'What is the evidence that established that, other than the evidence of the alibi, ultimately said to be false?'
  2. 'In the circumstances, his evidence as alibi evidence is most unpromising.'
  3. 'Mr Lydon claims he has an alibi to disprove Mr Dunlop's allegations as he was a guest speaker at a conference hosted by the IACT.'
  4. 'This conclusion is sufficient also to dispose of the complaint about redirection on the date of the alibi witness statements.'
  5. 'Kamara then claimed an alibi, that he was at a school with his sister and the Headmaster.'
  6. 'As it became clear that the DNA evidence was likely to be accepted, I wondered what new evidence would damage the alibi.'
  7. 'He claims an alibi for this morning - counseling sessions.'
  8. 'He called alibi evidence as to his earlier movements.'
  9. 'The appellant never himself gave evidence to support the alibi.'
  10. 'She made a statement to the police, giving Iftikhar a false alibi.'
  11. 'a catch-all alibi for failure and inadequacy'
  12. 'Excuses, alibis and wild cover-up stories chased each other around Harry's brain, each more feeble than the last.'
  13. 'On the other hand, he has to avoid the danger that the parties push all their difficult problems over to him so that they have an alibi for failure to achieve something.'
  14. 'We love to make excuses and believe alibis, however unlikely.'
  15. 'The second alibi, the Mongol invasion, is yet another favourite of their writing.'
  16. 'His apology for the production of ignorant students consists of the same bunch of alibis and rationalizations we've been fed by education professors for decades.'
  17. 'These guys will fall silent, then we'll be bombarded with a slew of alibis and lame excuses for their failure.'
  18. 'Until this spring when he told manager Phil Garner, he offered no alibis, accepted the criticism without complaint, and did the best he could with what he had.'
  19. 'His alibi was his ever-devoted mother who backed up his story.'
  20. 'His party already has its alibis lined up.'
  21. 'There are no excuses, no alibis and no grounds for recourse.'

verb

Provide an alibi for.
  1. 'On the 24th, the day that I was to have supposedly murdered Mrs. Stotler, the prosecutors themselves have alibied me, by collecting testimony.'
  2. 'Another topic of discussion has developed concerning the man who alibied the husband.'
  3. 'Roz gets her beloved son alibied by some nice simple, incontrovertible (well, provable) facts.'

More definitions

1. Law. the defense by an accused person of having been elsewhere at the time an alleged offense was committed.

2. an excuse, especially to avoid blame.

3. a person used as one's excuse: My sick grandmother was my alibi for missing school. verb (used without object)

4. Informal. to give an excuse; offer a defense: to alibi for being late. verb (used with object)

5. Informal. to provide an alibi for (someone): He alibied his friend out of a fix. to make or find (o

More examples(as adjective)

"witnesses can be alibi."

"functions can be alibi."

Origin

Late 17th century (as an adverb in the sense ‘elsewhere’): from Latin, ‘elsewhere’. The noun use dates from the late 18th century.