Adjective "alder" definition and examples

(Alder may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ˈɔːldə/

Definitions and examples

noun

A widely distributed tree of the birch family which has toothed leaves and bears male catkins and woody female cones.
  1. 'Birds nest in them, and bring in seeds of other trees like alders and oaks.'
  2. 'The total of the 10 lots listed was 788 oaks, over 350 alders and birches, over 230 holly, and over 120 ash.'
  3. 'The train passes mature hardwood maple, beech, yellow birch, hickory and American linden trees, and softwood alders and willows weeping over a calm pond.'
  4. 'For the first time in 2,000 years, Scots pine, alder, birch, hazel, holly, and mountain ash are set to reclaim a large swath of the Scottish Highlands.'
  5. 'Trees which are especially suited for erosion control include varieties of birch, cedar, alder, fir, pine and redwood.'
  6. 'Much of the weed was cleared out to allow easy angling, though plenty of silver birch, rowan, alder, sycamore and pine remain to provide a scenic backdrop.'
  7. 'Pollen studies by scientists have revealed that both of the island chains were once covered in dense woodlands of birch, alder, willow, hazel, rowan and aspen.'
  8. 'The most suitable trees for bulbs and tubers are alder, ash, birch, cherry / Japanese cherry, oak and fruit trees.'
  9. 'Just 14 acrres of broadleaf woodland remain, including oak, ash, alder and birch and several large yew trees.'
  10. 'The River Derwent was brown and high, ducks sheltered in eddies, and little birds flitted from alder to willow to alder.'

More definitions

1. any shrub or tree belonging to the genus Alnus, of the birch family, growing in moist places in northern temperate or colder regions and having toothed, simple leaves and flowers in catkins.

2. any of various trees or shrubs resembling an alder.

More examples(as adjective)

"carrs can be alder."

Origin

Old English alor, aler, of Germanic origin; related to German Erle; forms spelled with d are recorded from the 14th century.