Adjective "afield" definition and examples

(Afield may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/əˈfiːld/

Definitions and examples

adverb

To or at a distance.
  1. 'This club is known as far afield as Australia and New Zealand.'
  2. 'More than 12,000 T-shirts have been bought by people from as far afield as New Zealand and the USA.'
  3. 'His work took him to libraries as far afield as California and Michigan in the United States as well as Denmark and Germany.'
  4. 'The riders, although mostly local, did draw supporters from as far afield as Wigan and the Furness peninsula.'
  5. 'Marches were duly held across Europe and the US while demonstrations took place as far afield as Chile and Peru.'
  6. 'Visitors are reporting all hotels full, with many people having to stay as far afield as Preston and even Chesterfield.'
  7. 'Already there are fears that climate change will push malaria carrying mosquitoes even further afield.'
  8. 'The pub has run a successful jazz club for about two years and regularly attracts members from as far afield as Bristol and Swindon.'
  9. 'He also intends to invest in a comber to strip away unwanted leaves and a trailer so he can take sheaves to customers as far afield as Ireland and France.'
  10. 'The school's academic reputation and positive ethos attracts children from as far afield as Linlithgow and Alloa.'
In the field (in reference to hunting)
  1. 'If the weather turns nasty on you while afield have no worry, as the Diascope is water and dust proof.'
  2. 'Not many hunters go afield these days dressed in jeans, a worn Army jacket and old work boots.'
  3. 'Hunting season is upon us, and some of you may want to work up a new load to take afield this fall.'

More definitions

1. abroad; away from home.

2. off the beaten path; far and wide: to go afield in one's reading.

3. off the mark: His criticism was totally afield.

4. in or to the field or countryside.

5. beyond the range or field of one's experience, knowledge, acquaintanceship, etc.: a philosophy far afield of previous philosophical thought.

More examples(as adjective)

"displays can be afield."

"directors can be afield."

Origin

Middle English (in afield (sense 2)): from a- ‘on, in’ + field.