Adjective "adulterate" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/əˈdʌltəreɪt/adulterateAdjective/əˈdʌlt(ə)rət/

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Definitions and examples

verb

Render (something) poorer in quality by adding another substance.
  1. 'Legal problems arise when a dishonest producer adulterates the product by substituting synthetic vanillin for natural vanillin without properly identifying the flavoring on the label.'
  2. 'The significant feature is that it is still the natural derivative of the plant, and, save exceptionally, it is not adulterated by the addition of any further substances.'
  3. 'Some wine-makers throughout history sought to enhance either the quality or quantity of their product by adulterating the basic raw material, grapes, with other products.'
  4. 'Pot smokers short on time can use a variety of methods to avoid testing positive, such as diluting their urine by drinking a lot of water, substituting someone else's urine, or adulterating their sample with masking agents.'
  5. 'The authorities, especially, the health department, should take stringent action against those who are adulterating food.'
  6. 'In Europe in the middle ages, even butter and bread were often adulterated, a practice by which inferior or even dangerous materials were added to the ingredient list.'
  7. 'In retaliation, she poisoned the birthday cake of his nine-year-old daughter by adulterating the batter with juice from oleander leaves.'
  8. 'Africa also needs adequate regulatory supervision: formal mechanisms which ensure that drugs are not adulterated by the time they reach patients.'
  9. 'Some preparations are adulterated with phenylbutazone, ephedrine, aminopyrine or mandrake root.'
  10. 'It is supposed to be extra pure, but some believe that it is often adulterated with much cheaper, commercial, hexane, which is not pure and contains various hazardous substances such as the toxic benzene.'

adjective

Not pure or genuine.

    Definitions

    1. to debase or make impure by adding inferior materials or elements; use cheaper, inferior, or less desirable goods in the production of (any professedly genuine article): to adulterate food. adjective

    2. impure or debased; cheapened in quality or purity.

    3. adulterous.

    More examples(as adjective)

    "areas can be adulterate."

    Origin

    Early 16th century (as an adjective): from Latin adulterat- ‘corrupted’, from the verb adulterare.