Adjective "adulatory" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˌadʒʊˈleɪt(ə)ri/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Excessively praising or admiring.
  1. 'the tone here is adulatory and uncritical'
  2. 'Check out this slightly less adulatory leader from the selfsame paper.'
  3. 'America had Shirley Temple but Britain had ‘the little princesses, the darlings of the Empire,’ as an adulatory press described them.'
  4. 'I was in Wellington, too, when the Beatles came to town, but with all the proud independence of a self-righteous adolescent I chose not to join the adulatory crowd or even to go to the Fab Four's concerts.'
  5. 'One effort was an adulatory poem, Le Siecle de Louis le Grand, in which he claimed that Louis XIV's world equalled, and surpassed, that of the ancient world.'
  6. 'The reception in the hall, and in the press the day after, was almost universally adulatory.'
  7. 'I had read a Reader's Digest collection of adulatory articles about the great man.'
  8. 'Well over a century before Macaulay wrote on Bacon, John Aubrey (in Brief Lives) had given a somewhat adulatory account of Bacon's life.'
  9. 'Did Auden ever look back on his adulatory poem about Sigmund Freud, whom he makes out to be a secular saint of science, with similar embarrassment, once it began to seem that Freud's ideas may have hurt more people than they helped?'
  10. 'If the essays are not overly adulatory neither are they overly critical.'
  11. 'The rider enjoyed an adulatory press while he raced but now he is coming under fire from several sides with critics saying his team won't be ready and, if they are, they won't be competitive.'

Definitions

1. excessive devotion to someone; servile flattery.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be adulatory of institutes."

"profiles can be adulatory."

"terms can be adulatory."

"sermons can be adulatory."

"people can be adulatory."

More examples++

Origin

(adulation)