Adjective "admonished" definition and examples

(Admonished may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ədˈmɒnɪʃ/

Definitions and examples

verb

Reprimand firmly.
  1. 'During the city council's final session, council members criticized the current state of the Bali Hai pier and admonished the bureaucracy for their lack of care for the venue.'
  2. 'Violence is an increasing problem in schools; one victim was headbutted after admonishing a pupil and needed stitches.'
  3. 'He publicly criticised the Government's non-performance, and admonished the police and the judiciary for their inability to produce significant results in the war on crime and corruption.'
  4. 'It is important that you don't chastise or admonish yourself for your feelings.'
  5. 'When they reached the Squad's room, they all turned to either glare at or admonish Vi.'
  6. 'Now a television pundit, the player was admonished by his team manager, after he had criticised his team-mates.'
  7. 'Here's a video clip from MoveOn that shows him admonishing some TV show hosts.'
  8. 'In an editorial statement in ‘Asian Voice’ Mr Patel admonishes Mr Livingstone for ignoring non-English language media in the publishing section.'
  9. 'Mallman admonishes the musicians: ‘You got to keep going.’'
  10. 'But doctors are admonished to prescribe this pain reliever only with the utmost caution for a patient with limited kidney function.'
  11. 'You know, there's so much air time spent in this city on admonishing people to get out of their cars and take transit, cycle or walk.'
  12. 'Indeed, the Supreme Court has admonished us to leave such matters to Congress.'
  13. 'People walked and chatted with each other while occasionally admonishing their kids to stay close.'
  14. 'And those who are admonishing us to harden up, toughen up, I think we need to listen to that.'
  15. 'Citing biblical references, the letter admonishes women to remember that ‘your desire shall be for your husband, and he shall rule over you‘.'
  16. 'He claims to be a compassionate, caring man, often admonishing people to ‘love your neighbor like you would love to be loved yourself.’'
  17. 'Alan Hansen would recall that, despite having won the European Cup, the taciturn Paisley still admonished his men ‘it's winning the league that's important’.'
  18. 'They thrust them on me, admonishing me to be sure to boil them well before eating, as they were rock hard.'
  19. 'he admonished the people against the evil of such practices'
  20. 'We are admonished to avoid speaking ill of the dead, so we'll leave Derrida with this wonderful little story by Michael Martone, a leading figure in the Johns Hopkins creative writing program during the 1960s.'

More definitions

1. to caution, advise, or counsel against something.

2. to reprove or scold, especially in a mild and good-willed manner: The teacher admonished him about excessive noise.

3. to urge to a duty; remind: to admonish them about their obligations.

More examples(as adjective)

"senators can be admonished."

"porters can be admonished."

"people can be admonished."

"monarchs can be admonished."

"managers can be admonished."

More examples++

Origin

(admonish)Middle English amonest ‘urge, exhort’, from Old French amonester, based on Latin admonere ‘urge by warning’. Later, the final -t of amonest was taken to indicate the past tense, and the present tense changed on the pattern of verbs such as abolish; the prefix became ad- in the 16th century by association with the Latin form.