Adjective "admissible" definition and examples

(Admissible may not be an adjective, but it can be used as an adjective, click here to find out.)

Pronunciation

/ədˈmɪsɪb(ə)l/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Acceptable or valid, especially as evidence in a court of law.
  1. 'The new Criminal Justice Bill would make hear-say evidence more readily admissible in court.'
  2. 'Whether such a statement is admissible as evidence is a matter for the courts to decide.'
  3. 'That being so, the finding by the trial judge that the accused was guilty of the offence was not supported by admissible evidence.'
  4. 'There is no merit in this claim of deficiency, on the evidence properly admissible before me.'
  5. 'Further the opinion evidence now tendered relies upon factual statements which are still not supported by any admissible evidence.'
  6. 'The British government wants to make them admissible evidence in British courts.'
  7. 'In all such instances, after due consideration I was satisfied that the evidence was relevant and admissible.'
  8. 'The principal task of the courts will continue to be to ensure that, whatever the range of admissible evidence, coincidence is not confused with proof.'
  9. 'The court was left with no admissible evidence on this point.'
  10. 'In China, private detectives are not allowed to testify in court, and tape-recorded evidence is not admissible.'
Having the right to be admitted to a place.
  1. 'The green card is given to foreigners who are admissible.'
  2. 'However, the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada limit the number of students admissible without a first degree to 10 percent.'

More definitions

1. that may be allowed or conceded; allowable: an admissible plan.

2. capable or worthy of being admitted: admissible evidence.

More examples(as adjective)

"people can be admissible towards bases."

"notes can be admissible of acts."

"materials can be admissible in evidences."

"evidences can be admissible in courts."

"documents can be admissible in courts."

More examples++

Origin

Early 17th century: from medieval Latin admissibilis, from Latin admittere (see admit).