Adjective "accusative" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/əˈkjuːzətɪv/

Definitions and examples

adjective

(in Latin, Greek, German, and some other languages) denoting a case of nouns, pronouns, and adjectives which expresses the object of an action or the goal of motion.
  1. 'In ordinary English this is a function that goes with accusative case on a pronoun: if you knock on my door and I call out Who is it?'
  2. 'How idiomatic the infinitive / accusative construction was, however, is a matter of some debate.'
  3. 'It is the Gaulish cognate of Latin rex, whose stem is/reg /, as we see in forms such as the accusative singular regem and the nominative plural reges.'
  4. 'So free-standing pronouns are accusative, even when they're interpreted as subjects: Who did that?'
  5. 'The Greek preposition had several meanings, depending on whether it governed the accusative, genitive, or dative case.'
  6. 'However, when studying German I was taught some grammar: so I thus learned the difference between a past tense and a past participle, and the difference between the nominative and the accusative cases.'
  7. 'But if lindwig is an accusative object of the verb flugon, laora refers to the Hebrews: ‘the survivors fled the shield-army of the hostile ones.’'

noun

A word in the accusative case.
  1. 'For instance, Q. might choose to suggest we refer to qim and to qer posts using the nominative qe, the accusative qim and the genitive qer.'
  2. 'These would include the nominative (for the subject of a sentence), the accusative (for its object) and the genitive (to indicate possession).'
  3. 'Recall the fictional judge objecting to splitting in court, in one of the Rumpole stories; he used an accusative in a gerund object, even for a pronoun,'
  4. 'So in fact the accusative in the cartoon is not grammatical in Standard English as normally used.'
  5. 'As students of the language may recall, German has four cases - nominative, genitive, dative, and accusative - which see words change in order to explain their relationship to each other.'
  6. 'Classical Mongolian had seven cases, all clearly distinguished, in contrast to Latin: nominative, accusative, dative, genitive, ablative, instrumental, and comitative.'

Definitions

1. Grammar. (in certain inflected languages, as Latin, Greek, or Russian) noting a case whose distinctive function is to indicate the direct object of a verb or the object of certain prepositions. similar to such a case form in function or meaning.

2. Linguistics. pertaining to a type of language in which there is an accusative case or in which subjects of transitive verbs behave the same way as subjects of intransitive verbs.Compare ergative (def 2).

3. accusatory. nou

More examples(as adjective)

"cases can be accusative."

Origin

Late Middle English: from Latin ( casus) accusativus, literally ‘relating to an accusation or (legal) case’, translating Greek (ptōsis) aitiatikē ‘(the case) showing cause’.