Adjective "abiding" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/əˈbʌɪdɪŋ/

Definitions and examples

adjective

(of a feeling or memory) lasting a long time; enduring.
  1. 'First, there's the abiding faith - eternally celebrated by the press - that compromise is always and everywhere a good thing.'
  2. 'One view of the Revolution has abiding power in popular memory and public culture.'
  3. 'The abiding memory I will carry forward from 2003 is of the Special Olympics.'
  4. 'For many Republicans, the abiding feeling of the last generation has been that this unique pattern of party competitiveness was an aberration.'
  5. 'Though his vital signs returned to normal, the abiding fear was that oxygen deprivation had caused permanent kidney or brain damage.'
  6. 'And while he tried to stage a graceful exit from the presidential race, there remained an abiding sense of wistfulness.'
  7. 'One of the legacies of this Papacy was his deep and abiding interest in matters such as the defence of human rights.'
  8. 'Politics was an abiding passion and he retained a constant devotion to his father's Liberal Party.'
  9. 'Fanning is an instructive case because of his former identification with rock, which remains his abiding passion.'
  10. 'He had spent a political lifetime trying to instil the habits of democracy in his people - a disdain for dictators, an abiding faith in the constitutional system.'

Definitions

1. continuing without change; enduring; steadfast: an abiding faith.

More examples(as adjective)

"places can be abiding by sanctions."

"people can be abiding by laws."

"parties can be abiding by laws."

"memories can be abiding."

"interests can be abiding."

More examples++