Adjective "aberrant" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/əˈbɛr(ə)nt/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Departing from an accepted standard.
  1. 'The reasons why the pattern is aberrant are not complex.'
  2. 'But some fears are well-founded: fundamentalism has emerged as an aberrant, aggressive phenomenon in all the world's religions.'
  3. 'So, it doesn't excuse the behavior but I think it explains the atmosphere that gives rise to the aberrant behavior.'
  4. 'This is a system, not an individual's aberrant behaviour.'
  5. '‘Implicatory denial’ is when a state acknowledges torture but blames it on aberrant agents.'
  6. 'It's fun tearing apart this delusional woman's aberrant thought processes.'
  7. 'This aberrant conduct should not be rewarded by making fundamental changes in the way judges are nominated.'
  8. 'They were nothing more than the winners of a game we all wanted to play - a game that we knew rewarded certain aberrant tendencies.'
  9. 'If you're successful, you've doomed your family to a somewhat aberrant, abnormal existence, but it's public service.'
  10. 'It seems to me that this is just again reinforcing the conclusion that there were five or six aberrant soldiers.'
  11. 'aberrant chromosomes'
  12. 'Cells containing any of these types of chromosomal alterations were considered aberrant cells.'
  13. 'Review of the flow cytometric immunophenotypic data failed to reveal a monoclonal B-cell or aberrant T-cell population.'
  14. 'Flow cytometric immunophenotyping did not reveal an aberrant T cell or monoclonal B-cell population.'
  15. 'Cervical thymic masses are congenital lesions that result from aberrant thymic migration during embryogenesis.'
  16. 'Other aberrant gametophyte phenotypes were observed among the group of mutants that could form antheridia.'

Definitions

1. departing from the right, normal, or usual course.

2. deviating from the ordinary, usual, or normal type; exceptional; abnormal. noun

3. an aberrant person, thing, group, etc.

More examples(as adjective)

"forces can be aberrant in nuances."

"behaviours can be aberrant."

"sites can be aberrant."

"responses can be aberrant."

"expressions can be aberrant."

More examples++

Origin

Mid 16th century: from Latin aberrant- ‘wandering away’, from the verb aberrare, from ab- ‘away, from’ + errare ‘to stray’.