Adjective "Venal" definition and examples

Pronunciation

/ˈviːn(ə)l/

Definitions and examples

adjective

Showing or motivated by susceptibility to bribery; corrupt.
  1. 'their generosity had been at least partly venal'
  2. 'The emotional depth of the cast, whether it's Graham or one of his venal bosses, lends a dramatic weight to the story.'
  3. 'Those visionaries passed and were replaced by venal men who don't care for independence or sovereignty and who want to sell the country to the US.'
  4. 'As boring meeting after boring meeting takes place, we are supposed to care about these venal, self-absorbed egomaniacs.'
  5. 'She is many things - venal, arrogant, authoritarian, ruthless - but she is no dummy.'
  6. 'What damages teenagers is an adult world which caricatures them as vain, promiscuous, stupid and venal.'
  7. 'They may well be venal, amoral egomaniacs, but the one thing you can pretty much guarantee is that they will be sharp-tongued.'
  8. 'He regarded publishers, agents and reviewers as stupid and venal.'
  9. 'But politicians are expected to be venal and self-serving if given the chance.'
  10. 'The National candidate is portrayed as a venal, cynical and arrogant.'
  11. 'That said, of course there are many self serving, venal politicians.'

Definitions

1. willing to sell one's influence, especially in return for a bribe; open to bribery; mercenary: a venal judge.

2. able to be purchased, as by a bribe: venal acquittals.

3. associated with or characterized by bribery: a venal administration; venal agreements.

More examples(as adjective)

"officials can be venal as people."

"politicians can be venal."

"boroughs can be venal."

"rhetorics can be venal."

"people can be venal."

More examples++

Origin

Mid 17th century (in the sense ‘available for purchase’, referring to merchandise or a favour): from Latin venalis, from venum ‘thing for sale’.